Reviews

Episode 146 - Dr. Venus Tsui: The Invisible Ones: Male Survivors of Intimate Partner Abuse

Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:36:36 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Venus Tsui describes the pervasive shame that male victims of intimate partner abuse experience and their common belief that the services that do exist aren't built for them. The resulting alienation and hopelessness present powerful barriers to seeking support. Dr. Tsui describes the extent to which existing services are utilized by men and which formal and informal helpers they find most beneficial.

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Average Rating: 5 stars (7 listener reviews )

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Average Rating: 5stars  sw 521 male survivors of intimate partner violence review, Tuesday, January 24, 2017

By Hannah L :

Dr. Tsui's podcast really opens your eyes to the issue of male intimate partner violence (IPV) and its impact on the victims/survivors. A lot of the time when you think of IPV you think of men as the perpetrators and women as the victims but that is not always the case. I knew IPV could happen to men but I was not aware of how prevalent it was, in the US 800,000 men are raped or assaulted each year, not including the victims who do not come forward. There is such a stigma with men as IPV victims that most do not seek help or come forward with their accounts. Shame, denial, trapped are just some of the words Dr. Tsui used to describe why men do not seek help. There is such a gender bias with this issue as well as lack of services that stop men from seeking the help they can utilize. Dr. Tsui mentioned that in the US, there are only 19 male focused services and four shelters for DV victims back in 2014. I thought that was interesting because services no matter what they offer should be gender neutral. If more services were gender neutral more people may be willing to seek help. I found this podcast interesting because I myself recently came across a client who is going through IPV. I am not only helping him with linking him to agencies that focus on partner violence but I myself am learning of all the different services there are to offer because I am not familiar with them. Dr. Tsui mentioned the importance of programs specifically for men due to unique needs that may vary from women. Programs that are not only gendered sensitive or neutral but culturally sensitive as well. Dr. Tsui suggests using "support" over "help" as a way to decrease the stigma of masculinity. I think this podcast did a great job at bring about awareness to male IPV as well as alternatives or new directions to take the step to offer support and help to men who may feel uncomfortable or ashamed of what they experienced.

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Average Rating: 5stars  gendered perspectives of violence: podcast review, Saturday, February 07, 2015

By Elyse H :

Dr. Tsui's podcast offers an important perspective on the male experience of intimate partner violence (IPV). This issue is often examined and understood as a male-perpetrated event, placing females in the victim/survivor role. What about male survivors, how do they fare in a world that so often stigmatizes acts of violence? Dr. Tsui explores barriers to accessing services from the perspectives of men who have experienced IPV and cites counseling services as being the most effective service according to her study. Police were the least effective service. Dr. Tsui discusses that stigma, denial and fear all contribute to accessibility. These findings suggest that IPV amongst male survivors is an issue that is often hidden in our society and therefore it has immense potential to be addressed at a macro level.

As a student, I am often challenged to think critically about the way people interact with their environment and each other. Living in North America, it is easy to see that IPV is often portrayed from a gendered point of view in popular media. Just this morning while watching an episode of the television show Friends, they showed a “break-up scene” where Rachel was hitting Ross with a book and throwing it at him. This made me think, if this were reversed it would never make it to air yet it is a violent act nonetheless.

Just like we need to be mindful of providing services that imply non-judgment and are built upon accessibility to populations, we need to be equally mindful of the way that the core assumptions about issues are manifested. Dr. Tsui asks us to reconsider our perspective on this issue, especially those who work with people who may be survivors of IPV. Understanding the importance of language and equal service provisions can help create safety and security for the person seeking support. Overall, I found this podcast to be thought provoking and I was happy to hear this issue being spotlighted and thought about critically.






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Average Rating: 5stars  sw 521- podcast review, Friday, February 06, 2015

By Carrie P. :

The content of this podcast presented by Dr. Venus Tsui helps to shed light on a population of victims that is often overlooked. It is a common held belief that only females can be the victims of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), however Dr. Tsui’s research has helped to lend a voice to male victims of abuse. Some of the statistics shared by Dr. Tsui were surprising. Projected numbers show that around 800,000 men are victims of IPV in the United States yearly. And while a statistic like this shows that this is indeed a significant social problem, there are hardly the resources available for male victims as there are for female victims. Dr. Tsui went on to discuss how there are only 19 strictly male-exclusive programs, and only 4 shelters in the United States that serve men who are victims of IPV. It is clear seeing these numbers that the needs of these men are not truly being met. Men also face added stigma and bias when it comes to being victimized based on traditional social roles, or the notion that females are only the victims and never the perpetrators of abuse. As a future social worker, my attention was really grasped when Dr. Tsui pointed out that professionals must screen all clients as possible victims of abuse, as opposed to only screening women. If we are to take these findings seriously, and are to provide the same services for male victims of IPV, we must begin to throw away our own potential biases that women cannot perpetrate abuse. As currently practicing or future practitioners of social work it is vital for us to be properly trained, and to continue to educate ourselves around this topic. Dr. Tsui provides an excellent stepping stone into understanding the world of male victims of IPV.

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Average Rating: 5stars  sw521: a population that needs support, Wednesday, February 04, 2015

By Kristen Weber :

The podcast offered by Dr. Venus Tsui offers great insight into a seemingly forgotten population. 800,000 males per year in the U.S. experience rape and physical assault and there are only 19 male focused services and 4 shelters in the U.S. Dr. Tsui explored (1) the extent services are being utilized and how helpful are they, and (2) What extent are helpers being approached and how helpful are such helpers. The most utilized service by male survivors was counseling but counseling ranked only a 2.96 out of a 5 point scale for helpfulness. Substance abuse treatment was deemed the most helpful by male respondents but was the least utilized. Data also showed male survivors preferred informal helpers compared to formal and that the most preferred helper was the internet. The utilization of the internet for male survivors may be in part because of the anonymity of such online support groups. In formal helpers, mental health providers were found to be the most helpful (3.08) and the police were the least helpful (1.93). Dr. Tsui found through qualitative testimony that a major concern for male survivors and reason for not seeking support through police or mental health is a fear of losing custody of their children if their spouse responded with divorce or a custody battle.
Suggestions to encourage males to seek services are to create services that are more gender neutral and sensitive, create culturally sensitive programs, and a societal need to refrain from masculinity.
After watching this podcast, I feel that I have gained a more realistic scope into how many males in the US are impacted by IPV and the barriers they face in seeking support. I feel a sense of duty now that I am aware of this issue to act in a way that encourages, creates, and supports a culturally sensitive environment that will encourage male survivors to reach out for the needed services.

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Average Rating: 5stars  a population which needs support-male survivors of intimate partner abuse, Wednesday, February 04, 2015

By Anonymous :

The podcast offered by Dr. Venus Tsui offers great insight into a seemingly forgotten population. 800,000 males per year in the U.S. experience rape and physical assault and there are only 19 male focused services and 4 shelters in the U.S. Dr. Tsui explored (1) the extent services are being utilized and how helpful are they, and (2) What extent are helpers being approached and how helpful are such helpers. The most utilized service by male survivors was counseling but counseling ranked only a 2.96 out of a 5 point scale for helpfulness. Substance abuse treatment was deemed the most helpful by male respondents but was the least utilized. Data also showed male survivors preferred informal helpers compared to formal and that the most preferred helper was the internet. The utilization of the internet for male survivors may be in part because of the anonymity of such online support groups. In formal helpers, mental health providers were found to be the most helpful (3.08) and the police were the least helpful (1.93). Dr. Tsui found through qualitative testimony that a major concern for male survivors and reason for not seeking support through police or mental health is a fear of losing custody of their children if their spouse responded with divorce or a custody battle.
Suggestions to encourage males to seek services are to create services that are more gender neutral and sensitive, create culturally sensitive programs, and a societal need to refrain from masculinity.
After watching this podcast, I feel that I have gained a more realistic scope into how many males in the US are impacted by IPV and the barriers they face in seeking support. I feel a sense of duty now that I am aware of this issue to act in a way that encourages, creates, and supports a culturally sensitive environment that will encourage male survivors to reach out for the needed services.




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Average Rating: 5stars  the need for awareness in social work. , Sunday, February 01, 2015

By Jennifer Kilpatrick :

Dr. Tusi’s podcast addresses the issue of male partner domestic violence and sexual assault. She shares with the listeners the projected number of males experiencing rape or physical assault in the U.S. is approximately 800,000 and in the U.K approximately 2 million experiences this abuse. Dr. Tusi addresses the macro social issue related to the lack of services for male abuse survivors and the social stigma placed on the survivors.

Dr. Tusi explores services available in the U.S. for male victims using an internet search and found 19 treatment services and 4 shelters that service male victims. She discusses how awareness of this issue can help bridge the gap in treatment and that awareness from the medical, social services, and mental health community is very important in identifying male partner domestic violence.

Dr. Tusi bring up the macro issue of reframing the social stigma of masculinity and weakness related to getting treatment. She challenges the idea of help and shifts our thinking by identifying the positive components of seeking assistance such as demonstrating positive problem solving skills. It is important that individuals develop sensitivity to language choices and awareness of the barriers for male victims.

As social workers it is our responsibility to cultivate an awareness of this issue, and Dr. Tusi’s podcast offers important information that inspires a change in thinking on a macro level. After listening to her podcast, I feel as if I have greater awareness of this issue and a better understanding and appreciation of the various social barriers for male survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.




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Average Rating: 5stars  ssw521 assig., Friday, January 30, 2015

By Nicola Charles :

Dr. Venus Tsui's research focus is very important to the field of social work and society on a whole. She identifies the lack of social supports available to male victims of intimate partner violence. Dr. Tsui demonstrates the staggering numbers of men who experience IPV each year. In the U.S 800,000 males experience rape or physical assault, Canada 500,000 men experience spousal abuse and 2.7 million men experience partner abuse in the United Kingdom. These numbers depict domestic violence is not only a women’s issue, however is a social issues. Therefore as Dr. Tsui stated services need to be designed to be more gender sensitive.

I believe society and policymakers contribute largely to the stigmatization of IPV', resources, services and supports to address those affected by IPV are more geared to women and men are secluded. As Dr. Tsui presented, there are only 19 service providers and 4 shelters in the U.S who provide services to male victims of IPV. Society should pay more attention to addressing the impartiality towards men by developing equal support services. I question if these changes occur i.e. increase in services, whether reported IPV case increase.




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DISCLAIMER: The content shared by the presenter(s) and/or interviewer(s) of each podcast is their own and not necessarily representative of any views, research, or practice from the UB School of Social Work or the inSocialWork® podcast series.