inSocialWork® is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice and practice to research. inSocialWork® features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.

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Episode 241 - Dr. Heather Larkin and Amanda Aykanian: Strategies to Advance Service Delivery and Address the Challenges of the Homeless Population: Social Work's Call to Action (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Elizabeth Bowen, PhD

Monday, June 04, 2018, 8:23:28 AM

Image of Dr. Heather Larkin and Amanda Aykanian

In the first of a two-part podcast, our guests Dr. Heather Larkin and Amanda Aykanian discuss strategies designed to strengthen homeless services and empower the social work profession to assume a lead role in ending homelessness. They describe the National Center for Excellence in Homeless Services, the Center's ties to the Social Work Grand Challenges, and the National Homelessness Social Work Initiative. The episode concludes by exploring misperceptions about homeless social work practice, what it actually means to work in homeless services, and how engaging in this area provides opportunities for interconnectivity across all levels of practice.

Heather Larkin, PhD, is an associate professor at the University at Albany and co-director of the National Center for Excellence in Homeless Services. Dr. Larkin has experience researching the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and service use among homeless people. She also co-developed the Restorative Integral Support (RIS) model. RIS is used to integrate evidence-sup