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inSocialWork® is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice and practice to research. inSocialWork® features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.

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The following episodes are in one or more categories related to:

Episode 65 - Marion Bogo: Doing, Thinking, Then Doing Again: Reflective Practice in Field Education

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Episode 219 - Beth Kanter: The Happy, Healthy Nonprofit: Creating a Self-Care Culture Within the Workplace

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD

Monday, July 03, 2017, 7:31:02 AM

Image of Beth Kanter

In this episode, Beth Kanter, author of "The Happy, Healthy Nonprofit," offers strategies to help both individuals and nonprofit organizations obtain impact without burnout and create a culture of self-care within the workplace. She discusses creative techniques to promote organizational changes that are designed to advance employees' well-being.

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Episode 207 - Dr. Julie Dodge, Dr. Christie Bernklau Halvor, and Dr. Sonja Vegdahl: Using Gamification in Social Work Education

Interviewer: Steve Sturman

Monday, January 16, 2017, 9:17:05 AM

Image of Dr. Julie Dodge, Dr. Christie Bernklau Halvor, and Dr. Sonja Vegdahl

Online coursework is now a mainstream approach to the delivery of education and training to professional social workers in the United States. As online courses and programs grow, more and more faculty will be asked to teach using platforms and instructional methods that they may be unfamiliar with. One of these methods is known as gamification. While it should not be confused with game-based learning, it uses game-like features in the educational setting. In 2015, three members of the Concordia University social work faculty decided to incorporate some gamification elements into one course each was teaching. In this episode, Drs. Julie Dodge, Christie Bernklau Halvor, and Sonja Vegdahl explore that experience.

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Episode 204 - Dr. Annemarie Gockel: Practicing Presence: A Curriculum for Integrating Mindfulness Training into Direct Practice Instruction

Interviewer: Elaine Hammond

Monday, November 21, 2016, 7:36:30 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Annemarie Gockel describes her work, research, and experience as a social work educator who integrates mindfulness training with students into her social work courses. She discusses what mindfulness can look like in a classroom setting and how to introduce this method in this context.

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Episode 199 - Karen Zgoda, Dr. Melanie Sage, Dr. Jonathan Singer, and Dr. Lauri Goldkind: Technology-Mediated Assignments for Real World Learning

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD

Monday, September 12, 2016, 7:44:53 AM

Image of Karen Zgoda, Dr. Melanie Sage, Dr. Jonathan Singer, and Dr. Lauri Goldkind

Have you considered incorporating technology or social media into your courses? If you have, then you are not alone. However, it can be daunting, given that there seems to be an increasing push to use these digital tools but not much direction as to how to do it. In this podcast, four social work educators talk about how they have used digital tools in their teaching. Professors Karen Zgoda, Melanie Sage, Jonathan Singer, and Lauri Goldkind offer examples from their work as they share thoughts about, and experiences with, integrating technology-mediated assignments into their coursework.

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Episode 186 - Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone: The Anti-Racism Project: A Strategy for Preparing Social Work Educators

Interviewer: Berg Miller, MSW

Monday, February 29, 2016, 8:52:37 AM

Image of Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone

The NASW Code of Ethics and International Federation of Social Workers’ "Statement of Ethical Principles" call for social workers to challenge discrimination, oppression, and "unjust policies and practices." In the United States, racism remains a lasting and pernicious example of those injustices. In this podcast, Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone describe the development of their Anti-Racism Project. The discussion includes their experience as the Project's facilitators and group members, research connected to the Project, and their advocacy for the need to include equity work in social work doctoral education. They also identify four important themes that seemed to emanate from their work.

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Episode 184 - Nancy Roget: Around the Next Curve: Using Technology in Addiction Social Work Practice

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, February 01, 2016, 7:51:28 AM

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The literature on the use of tele-mental health is more than 50 years old, yet its integration into clinical social work practice has lagged. In this episode, Nancy Roget illustrates how technology can be incorporated into clinical social work by using applications being developed to address the treatment and recovery needs of substance addicted individuals. Additionally, Ms. Roget explores the of use of technology in clinical supervision.

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Episode 182 - Megan Connelly, Elisabeth Preisinger, and Lidia Snyder: Community Revitalization: A Macro Field Education Experience

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, January 04, 2016, 8:18:46 AM

Image of Megan Connelly, Elisabeth Preisinger, and Lidia Snyder

In this episode, Megan Connelly, Director of Policy Advancement for the Partnership for Public Good; Elisabeth Preisinger, a recent second-year student placed at the Partnership; and Lidia Snyder, the field educator who supervised the placement, discuss the experiences of a social work student placed in a macro-oriented, inter-professional setting.

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Episode 181 - Chad Allee: Leadership in Social Work

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz, LCSW

Monday, December 07, 2015, 7:40:36 AM

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The idea of leadership is finding its way more often into the discussions of professional social work, but what is meant by "leadership"? And, what does being a "leader" mean? In this episode, Chad Allee describes what leadership is, argues for the importance of leadership in social work, and points to the need to cultivate more social work leaders.

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Episode 175 - A Panel Discussion on Systemic Racism (part 2 of 2)

Monday, September 14, 2015, 7:32:04 AM

Image of Elizabeth Bowen, Diane Elze, Isok Kim, and Charles Syms

In this episode, the second of two parts, Professors Elizabeth Bowen, Diane Elze, Isok Kim, and Charles Syms of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work continue their conversation about how they have approached the topic of systemic racism with their social work students. Here the panel's discussion shifts to why they believe it is important for social work education to specifically address the issue of racism. They also explore this topic from the School of Social Work's trauma-informed, human rights perspective.

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Episode 173 - A Panel Discussion on Systemic Racism (part 1 of 2)

Monday, August 17, 2015, 9:38:01 AM

Image of Elizabeth Bowen, Diane Elze, Isok Kim, and Charles Syms

The social work code of ethics asks that social workers focus efforts at addressing discrimination and other forms of social injustice. Therefore, it is essential that social workers in training be provided the opportunity to learn about and explore the inequities faced by individuals, groups, and communities they will work with. In this episode, the first of two parts, four members of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work faculty (Elizabeth Bowen, Diane Elze, Isok Kim, and Charles Syms) share their experience and thoughts about leading classroom discussions on this important and often challenging topic.

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Episode 168 - Dr. Lisa Butler and Janice Carello: Potentially Perilous Pedagogies: Teaching Trauma Is Not the Same as Trauma-Informed Teaching

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, May 25, 2015, 10:59:56 AM

Image of Lisa Butler and Janice Carello

The prevalence data is significant: many students have had exposure to traumatic experiences. In this episode, Lisa Butler and Janice Carello describe a trauma-informed framework for teaching and education. They discuss the importance of recognizing the risks that exposure to trauma poses to students' academic success and the need for emotional safety in the learning environment.

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Episode 163 - Ken Herrmann and Susan Herrmann: Social Work Education in Another Land: The Brockport Vietnam Project

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, March 16, 2015, 9:33:01 AM

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In this podcast, Ken and Susan Herrmann discuss their work with local stakeholders and Danang University in developing and operating an international social work educational program, The Brockport Vietnam Project. The discussion highlights the project’s mission, how it operates, its work in the local communities, and the learning opportunities and takeaways for students. The discussion might well be instructive for institutions or programs considering similar types of programs in developing countries.

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Episode 154 - Dr. Toba Kerson and Dr. Judith McCoyd: In Response to Need: An Analysis of Social Work Roles Over Time

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, October 27, 2014, 11:08:03 AM

Image of Dr. Toba Kerson and Dr. Judith McCoyd

In this episode, based on a research article published in the journal Social Work in 2013, Drs. Toba Kerson and Judith McCoyd discuss their latest work re-examining interviews conducted in 1976 with the pioneers of health-related social work. They compare those with themes they identified with current workers in the healthcare field and describe how the distinctive way that social workers respond to needs remains consistent with our core values and skill set.

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Episode 137 - Eda Kauffman: Clinical Supervision: Integrating a Trauma-Informed Lens

Interviewer: Marjorie Quartley, LCSW-R

Monday, February 17, 2014, 9:24:29 AM

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In this episode, Eda Kauffman explains how she came to incorporating a trauma-informed lens into her work as a clinical supervisor. She describes how trauma-informed clinical supervision is different from traditional supervision. She also explores its use in social work field education.

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Episode 133 - Elaine Hammond: Burnout and Self-Care in Social Work

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD, MSW

Monday, December 09, 2013, 8:44:48 AM

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Burnout and compassion fatigue are significant concerns in professional social work. Either can leave social workers feeling angry, overwhelmed, drained, and/or powerless. This can lead to disengagement from client systems as well as the work. To be effective and professional and develop in their work, social workers must learn the skills necessary to take care of themselves. In this podcast, Elaine Hammond uses a trauma-informed perspective to provide a paradigm for the creation of an individualized self-care strategy.

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Episode 127 - Dr. Michael Reisch: The State of Social Work Education (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary N. Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, September 16, 2013, 9:23:56 AM

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This is the second episode of a two-part discussion with Dr. Michael Reisch on the state of social work education in America. In this episode, Dr. Reisch offers his insights on a number of specific topics he believes must be attended to in order to strengthen social work education and continue to advance the profession.

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Episode 125 - Dr. Michael Reisch: The State of Social Work Education (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary N. Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, August 19, 2013, 9:03:02 AM

Image of Dr. Michael Reisch

In this episode, the first of two parts, Dr. Michael Reisch describes the role that social work education has in facilitating the emerging professional’s understanding of the institutional and structural inequalities facing oppressed and disenfranchised people. He also discusses the necessity for social work to reconnect with its historical mission of directly addressing social injustice.

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Episode 117 - Kori Bloomquist: Social Worker Self-Care: Practice, Perceptions, and Professional Well-Being

Interviewer: Elaine Hammond, LMSW

Monday, April 15, 2013, 8:51:38 AM

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In this episode, Kori Bloomquist discusses research related to social worker self-care practice and perceptions, and professional well-being. Ms. Bloomquist describes social workers' reported self-care practices across five domains as well as their perceptions of self-care. She also discusses relationships between social worker self-care practices and perceptions and indicators of professional well-being, including compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. Furthermore, Ms. Bloomquist talks about implications for social work education, practice, and research.

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Episode 111 - Marion Bogo: Innovations in Assessment of Students' Competence in Social Work

Interviewer: Marjorie Quartley, LCSW-R

Monday, January 21, 2013, 12:15:03 AM

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In this episode, Professor Marion Bogo discusses research she has conducted on innovative methods for educational outcomes assessment in social work. She describes a program of research that looks at conceptualizing and assessing social work students’ competence. She also reviews some of the challenges in assessing students in their field experience. Finally, Professor Bogo discusses the development and testing of two innovative assessment methods: 1) an online tool for use in field evaluation and 2) the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) adapted for social work student assessment.

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Episode 100 - Dr. Nancy Smyth: The UB School of Social Work: Adventures and Future Ideas in a Digital Age

Interviewer: Anthony Guzman, MISM, MNCM

Monday, July 09, 2012, 9:15:31 AM

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It's our 100th episode, and we have invited our Dean, Dr. Nancy Smyth, to reflect on our long, sometimes strange trip as we've found our way in producing years of compelling podcasts and sharing the work of our tremendous guests. Dr. Smyth discusses the early days of our series, our impact so far, and her thoughts about the future as Social Work and Social Work Education comes to grips with the risks and opportunities in the digital age.

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Episode 68 - Dr. Michael Reisch: How Did Social Work Get Here?: The Historical Narratives That Shape Social Work Research and Practice (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, DSW, MS

Monday, April 04, 2011, 9:21:13 AM

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This is the second of two episodes in which Dr. Michael Reisch describes how the past is the present, and how "master narratives" about historical events have come to frame how the social work research agenda has been set, how its been done, and how its findings have been implemented. Dr. Reisch continues his historical overview from the 1930's to present day, touching on the eras of McCarthyism, Marxsim, Scientific Positivism, and Post-Modernism. He concludes with provocative observations and challenges for current research and practice.

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Episode 66 - Dr. Michael Reisch: How Did Social Work Get Here?: The Historical Narratives That Shape Social Work Research and Practice (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, DSW, MS

Monday, March 07, 2011, 8:37:49 AM

Image of Dr. Michael Reisch

This is first of two episodes in which Dr. Michael Reisch describes how "the past is the present" and how "master narratives" about historical events have come to frame how the social work research agenda has been set, how it's been done, and how its findings have been implemented. Dr. Reisch begins with the Progressive Era and concludes part one with the New Deal period.

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Episode 60 - Alankaar Sharma: Tuskegee and the Negro Project: The Intersections of Race, Gender, and Public Health (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 29, 2010, 8:33:52 AM

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This is the second of two episodes in which Alankaar Sharma discusses his work comparing and contrasting the well-known Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments and the lesser known Negro Project, both intended to further knowledge related to prevention and reducing the extent of sexually transmitted disease in African-American men. Here, Mr. Sharma concludes his discussion by attempting to answer the question, "Why the immense difference in support and time between the two studies?" He concludes with comments about African-American access to health care services today, and "post-racial" America.

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Episode 58 - Alankaar Sharma: Tuskegee and the Negro Project: The Intersections of Race, Gender, and Public Health (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 01, 2010, 11:22:31 AM

Image of Alankaar Sharma

From Tuskegee to current revelations of U.S. experiments in Guatemala in the 1940's, public health research and interventions have been impacted by intersections with race and gender. This is the first of two episodes in which Alankaar Sharma discusses his work comparing and contrasting the well-known Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments and the lesser known Negro Project, both intended to further knowledge related to prevention and reducing the extent of sexually transmitted disease in African-American men. Here, he describes the historical context of the studies and how stereotypical and dominant narratives of Black men influenced the research.

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Episode 41 - Dr. Elisabeth Reichert: Social Work and Human Rights

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD, MSSA

Monday, March 08, 2010, 10:46:40 AM

Image of Dr. Elisabeth Reichert

In this episode, Dr. Elisabeth Reichert traces the history of the human rights movement and addresses the role of social work in that movement. She discusses the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, political, civil, social, and economic rights, and women's rights, and compares the concepts of universal verses culturally relative human rights. She concludes with a discussion of the role of international education and improved understanding of human rights.

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Episode 39 - Maria Cristalli and Dr. Catherine Dulmus: University-Community Partnerships: A Match Made in Social Research and Human Services Heaven

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD, MSW

Monday, February 08, 2010, 8:44:11 AM

Image of Maria Cristalli and Dr. Catherine Dulmus

This episode features a conversation between Catherine Dulmus, Associate Professor, Associate Dean for Research, and Research Center Director at UB's School of Social Work, and Maria Cristalli, Hillside Family of Agencies' Chief Strategy and Quality Officer. They discuss the formation of their Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) project to promote research to practice and practice to research.

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Episode 24 - Dr. Frederic Reamer: Ethical Dilemmas in Contemporary Social Work: Trends and Challenges

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz, PhD Candidate

Monday, July 13, 2009, 7:33:15 AM

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This discussion highlights a wide range of complex and challenging ethical issues in contemporary social work. Frederic Reamer introduces listeners to an array of ethical dilemmas that arise in clinical social work, supervision, administration, and advocacy. He shares his insights about the ways in which ethical standards in social work have changed over time and summarizes what he believes is essential ethics-related knowledge for every social worker.

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Episode 18 - Dr. Bruce Thyer: Looking at Evidence-Based Practice: How Did We Get Here?

Monday, April 20, 2009, 2:10:26 PM

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This podcast is a recording of a lecture by Professor Bruce Thyer on the roots of the evidence-based practice process. He grounds it in the best tradition of clinical social work, from the early development of scientific social work to empirically supported treatments.

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Episode 14 - Dr. Cal Stoltenberg: Evidence-Based Clinical Supervision (part 2 of 2)

Monday, February 23, 2009, 11:25:20 AM

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This is the second of two episodes in which Dr. Stoltenberg talks about the art of clinical supervision. In Part 2, Dr. Stoltenberg tackles the question, "How do we evaluate what's occurring in supervision and how is it affecting work with clients?" Stoltenberg suggests that supervision should be concerned with tracking what clinicians are implementing with clients, how are they implementing it, and how effectively it is working.

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Episode 12 - Dr. Cal Stoltenberg: Evidence-Based Clinical Supervision (part 1 of 2)

Monday, January 26, 2009, 11:12:33 AM

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This is the first of a two part podcast by Dr. Cal Stoltenberg about the art / science of clinical supervision. In this episode, Dr. Stoltenberg addresses the difference between supervision and clinical work with clients. He cautions against becoming too focused on distinct competencies, and recognizes the need to implement quality training. In addition, Stoltenberg notes that there are different models of supervision, and that individual characteristics and culture must be factored into the clinical supervision relationship.

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Episode 11 - Dr. Shelly Wiechelt: Cultural and Historical Trauma: Affecting Lives for Generations

Interviewer: Susan Green, LCSW

Monday, January 12, 2009, 12:03:52 PM

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People experience trauma in varying ways, from both trauma that occurs within their own lives, to trauma that is transmitted to them from cultural, historical, and intergenerational experiences. In this podcast, Dr. Shelly Wiechelt defines cultural, intergenerational, and historical trauma and discusses its impact on the lives of individuals and their communities.

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Episode 10 - Dr. Sandra Bloom: The Sanctuary Model: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Treatment and Services

Interviewer: Susan Green, LCSW

Monday, December 29, 2008, 11:27:32 AM

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Sandra L. Bloom, M.D., co-creator of the Sanctuary Model, discusses a trauma-informed approach to treatment and systems change. Dr. Bloom describes the paradigm shift needed to understand the psychobiology of trauma and its impact on recovery from mental illness.

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Episode 9 - Dr. Hilary Weaver: Culturally Competent Supervision

Monday, December 15, 2008, 10:50:04 AM

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This episode features Dr. Hilary Weaver speaking at the Fourth International Interdisciplinary Conference on Clinical Supervision, convened in Buffalo, NY, Spring 2008. Dr. Weaver discusses diversity issues in the context of supervision, highlighting the Transactional Model of Identity and the critical role supervisors have in promoting, modeling, and developing cultural competence within human service organizations.

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Episode 5 - Dr. Lawrence Shulman: Models of Supervision: Parallel Processes and Honest Relationships

Interviewer: Peter Sobota, LCSW

Monday, October 20, 2008, 12:31:04 PM

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What is supervision? Peter Sobota, Clinical Assistant Professor at the UB School of Social Work, speaks with Dr. Lawrence Shulman, Professor and Dean Emeritus of the UB School Of Social Work, about the nature of supervision in direct practice and administration. During their conversation they touch upon issues of power, authority, trust, and role clarity, to name a few.

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Episode 4 - Dr. Alex Gitterman: The Life Model: A 30-year Reflection

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD, MSW

Monday, October 06, 2008, 1:32:16 PM

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Dean Nancy Smyth speaks with Dr. Alex Gitterman, the Council on Social Work Education's 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, about the Life Model of Social Work Practice and its continued influence on the field.

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Episode 2 - Dr. Deborah Waldrop: End-of-Life Care for Our Nation's Elderly - History of Hospice Care (part 1 of 3)

Monday, September 08, 2008, 11:08:35 AM

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This is this first of three episodes in which Dr. Waldrop discusses her research on end-of-life care decision-making begun in 2007. In this episode, Dr. Waldrop explains the personal nature of studying end-of-life care and answers the questions, "What is hospice care?" and "What is its history?"

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DISCLAIMER: The content shared by the presenter(s) and/or interviewer(s) of each podcast is their own and not necessarily representative of any views, research, or practice from the UB School of Social Work or the inSocialWork® podcast series.

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