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inSocialWork® is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice and practice to research. inSocialWork® features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.

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The following episodes are in one or more categories related to:

Episode 20 - Dr. Kelly Jackson: What Are You?: The Experience of Multiracial Individuals in a Monoracial World

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Episode 224 - Janelle Goodwill: How Media Influences Young Black Men's Conceptualization of Masculinity

Interviewer: Chris St. Vil, PhD

Monday, September 25, 2017, 9:18:36 AM

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In this episode, our guest Janelle Goodwill, MSW, describes her work on the YBMen Project, which studies what is unique about how media affects young black men in college. Exploring their preferences and learning how young black men use media for support, our guest discusses how media affects their mental health and their view of Black masculinity.

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Episode 209 - Dr. Omid Safi: "Islamophobia" in America

Interviewer: Isok Kim, PhD

Monday, February 13, 2017, 7:40:38 AM

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Muslims have been part of the fabric of America for more than five hundred years. There were likely Muslim members of Columbus's crew when they arrived in the American hemisphere in 1492. Trans-Atlantic slavery would have certainly brought to this country Africans who practiced Islam. During the ratification of the United States Constitution, concern was voiced that one day there might be a Muslim president. Yet in the early 1800's, the Ramadan fast was once ended in the White House. In this podcast, our guest Dr. Omid Safi examines the complex history of Muslims in America. In doing so, his discussion helps us to more fully understand the impact of "Islamophoboia" in the United States.

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Episode 206 - Dr. David Gerber: The Continuing Relevance of Immigration History

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, January 02, 2017, 8:31:33 AM

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In this episode, Dr. David Gerber applies a lens of immigration history in the United States and helps us understand the reticence to reform our immigration policy and laws. He highlights how the popular narrative we have about immigrants and refugees stands in sharp contrast to what is really happening in our society.

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Episode 200 - Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault: Enhancing Relationships Forums: People and Law Enforcement Agencies Moving Change Forward

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, September 26, 2016, 7:40:54 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault discuss their response to the widening divide between the African-American community and law enforcement officials. Following the killings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice, as well as NYPD officers Rafeal Ramos and Wenjian Liu, our guests developed a working group and an action plan. Enhancing Relationships Forums is the tangible result, and it brings together representatives of law enforcement personnel, the Social Work profession, members of the African-American community, and the community at large for empathic dialog. Here, they describe the process, lessons learned, and recommendations for community action in communities everywhere.

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Episode 196 - Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee: Lessons from the Immigrant Experience: Where the Erosion of Social Justice Begins (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, August 01, 2016, 7:40:48 AM

Image of Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee

In the second of a two-part podcast, Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee continue their conversation chronicling the experiences of immigrants and examining the history of U.S. policy addressing the needs of these people. In this episode, they explore common myths that characterize our popular and policy discussions about immigrants and describe how these policies affect lives in our communities. Our guests conclude with recommendations for skills needed by social workers who provide services to these clients.

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Episode 195 - Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee: Lessons from the Immigrant Experience: Where the Erosion of Social Justice Begins (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, July 04, 2016, 9:13:52 AM

Image of Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee

In this first of two episodes, Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee discuss their work chronicling the experiences of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers while examining the history of U.S. policies addressing the needs of these people. Utilizing human rights and social justice as context, they observe that the development and changes in U.S. policy have historically addressed mostly the needs of the dominant culture. Our guests describe the reality for immigrants, the persons most affected by our debate and policies.

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Episode 185 - Dr. Pablo Arriaza: Spanish Language Self-Efficacy Beliefs Among Spanish-Speaking Social Workers

Interviewer: Julie Hasselbeck

Monday, February 15, 2016, 8:25:47 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Pablo Arriaza argues that simply speaking and understanding another language does not equate to language competency. He describes what he learned about Spanish-speaking social workers' beliefs about their own self-efficacy with the Spanish language and their need for support, validation, and quality supervision. Dr. Arriaza explains why bilingual social workers are crucial in assisting the profession to act on its core values.

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Episode 176 - Adalberto Méndez López and Dr. Filomena Critelli: Globally Connected Classrooms: Partnership, Technology, and Human Rights

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, September 28, 2015, 7:39:58 AM

Image of Adalberto Méndez López and Dr. Filomena Critelli

In this episode, our guests Adalberto Méndez López and Dr. Filomena Critelli discuss their experience of bringing their students together via technology to co-instruct a new course titled "Disability and Human Rights from the Perspective of Law and Social Work". Along the way, they tell what they learned while bridging the gap between disciplines, cultures, degrees of technological know-how, and geographical locations.

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Episode 174 - Dr. Yabome Gilpin-Jackson: Post-Traumatic Growth and Moments of Resonance: Narratives on Ebola in West Africa

Interviewer: Robert Keefe, PhD

Monday, August 31, 2015, 8:09:41 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Yabome Gilpin-Jackson describes the systemic impact of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. She articulates what she is learning about post-traumatic growth as part of the narrative for both individuals and larger systems as they make meaning of their experiences.

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Episode 171 - Dr. William Wipfler: Human Rights and Torture (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Stephanie Sacco

Monday, July 06, 2015, 8:51:02 AM

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In 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration's thirty articles outline twenty-four basic rights afforded to all people simply because they are human beings. In this episode, Dr. William Wipfler, having spent more than 60 years advocating for human rights, discusses his human rights work, the issue of torture, and his belief that human rights abuses must always be confronted.

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Episode 163 - Ken Herrmann and Susan Herrmann: Social Work Education in Another Land: The Brockport Vietnam Project

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, March 16, 2015, 9:33:01 AM

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In this podcast, Ken and Susan Herrmann discuss their work with local stakeholders and Danang University in developing and operating an international social work educational program, The Brockport Vietnam Project. The discussion highlights the project’s mission, how it operates, its work in the local communities, and the learning opportunities and takeaways for students. The discussion might well be instructive for institutions or programs considering similar types of programs in developing countries.

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Episode 155 - Dr. Wendy Haight: Caregivers' Moral Narratives of Their African American Children's Out-of-School Suspensions: Implications for Effective Family-School Collaborations

Interviewer: Annette Semanchin-Jones, PhD

Monday, November 10, 2014, 9:39:43 AM

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A report from 2006 indicates that almost three and half million children were suspended or expelled from American schools. Of additional concern is that black students are suspended or expelled at a rate three times that of their white peers. In this podcast, Dr. Wendy Haight explores this problem through the experiences and perceptions of those students' caretakers. Dr. Haight's work provides a different view and offers another opportunity for social work to address this complex problem.

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Episode 153 - Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Laurie Cook Heffron: Modern Slavery: Social Work's Role in Addressing Human Trafficking

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, October 13, 2014, 8:04:28 AM

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The United Nations Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking estimates that there as many as 2.5 million people in forced labor at any given time. The U.S. State Department estimates that between 600,000 and 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year. There may be as many as 27 million slaves in the world today. In this episode, Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Ms. Laurie Cook Heffron examine these disturbing issues and describe social work's role in addressing them.

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Episode 151 - Arati Maleku: Human Migration in the 21st Century: Implications for the Social Work Profession

Interviewer: Isok Kim, PhD

Monday, September 15, 2014, 7:26:17 AM

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Human migration is a natural phenomenon as old as humanity. Some people leave their places of origin to escape natural or human-caused calamities. Others leave to find better economic circumstances. And, for some, it may be the adventure of new and exciting experiences. In this episode, Arati Maleku discusses current trends in human migration, explains some of migration's challenges and opportunities, and offers suggestions on social work practice with migrant populations.

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Episode 146 - Dr. Venus Tsui: The Invisible Ones: Male Survivors of Intimate Partner Abuse

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:36:36 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Venus Tsui describes the pervasive shame that male victims of intimate partner abuse experience and their common belief that the services that do exist aren't built for them. The resulting alienation and hopelessness present powerful barriers to seeking support. Dr. Tsui describes the extent to which existing services are utilized by men and which formal and informal helpers they find most beneficial.

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Episode 142 - Chandran Chetan: Action and Empowerment in India: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, April 28, 2014, 8:41:06 AM

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In this episode, Chandran Chetan continues our previous discussion of India's "invisible maids" and the human trafficking that is fostered by the demand for these workers. Here, our guest describes how the National Domestic Workers Movement builds institutional support for the workers and how they promote social action and change through the direct participation of the women in speaking out on their own behalf. Fr. Chetan highlights the movement's work in organization and unionization activities and outlines the current activity and challenges on behalf of this exploited population.

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Episode 140 - Christin Mary: India's Invisible Maids: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, March 31, 2014, 8:08:27 AM

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In this episode, Christin Mary of the National Domestic Workers Movement describes her work advocating, organizing, and participating in social action to empower exploited domestic workers in India. Young women, typically from impoverished rural areas, are trafficked into cities, where their human rights are violated. Our guest describes her organization's efforts in organizing and empowering these women, as well as the legislative successes they have realized.

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Episode 129 - Agnes Williams: Native Americans and a Human Rights and Trauma-Informed Perspective

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, MSW, PhD

Monday, October 14, 2013, 9:56:42 AM

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In this episode, Ms. Agnes Williams, a member of the Seneca Nation, uses her Nation's experience as a context to discuss cultural appreciation. She also explores the concept of historical trauma as well as the ideals of human rights and social justice, and how those ideals have been compromised. Additionally, she reflects on her work with social work student interns and the need to take affirmative steps to provide support for Native American social work students.

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Episode 128 - Dr. Md. Tuhinul Islam: Residential Childcare: The Experiences of Children in Bangladesh

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, MSW, PhD

Monday, September 30, 2013, 9:30:01 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Md. Tuhinul Islam takes us on a journey to Bangladesh, where he studies the experiences of children in residential childcare settings. He describes how and why children find their way to these settings and what he is learning about outcomes, including those who leave those institutions.

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Episode 119 - Dr. Dona Reese: "A Friendly Face:" Addressing Barriers to Hospice Care for African American Clients by Hiring African American Social Workers

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 13, 2013, 8:59:13 AM

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The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization reported that in 2011 over a million and a half people utilized hospice services in the United States. In this podcast, Dr. Dona Reese talks about the lack of utilization of hospice care by African American patients. This includes identifying variables that influence African American hospice use. One of those barriers is the almost complete absence of African American staff or volunteers in hospices across the nation. Dr. Reese describes a field placement and community intervention project that was a successful first step in accomplishing the goal of increasing African American staff. Additionally, she offers her thoughts on what must be done to expand the number of African American social work professionals in hospice settings.

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Episode 101 - Aster Tecle: Where is 'Home'? Interpreting Youth Discourse and the Politics of Displaced Youth

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD, LCSW, ACSW

Monday, August 20, 2012, 9:48:19 AM

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In this episode, Ms. Tecle discusses her current research on the experiences of immigrant youth participating in youth programs. She examines the complexities of identity formation among Horn of Africa immigrant youth and how those youth create place and space in a larger sociocultural structure that often labels difference as "misfitness."

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Episode 88 - Dr. Manisha Joshi: Attitudes Toward Intimate Partner Violence Among Women in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD, MSW

Monday, January 23, 2012, 8:03:52 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Manisha Joshi utilizes a unique lens to look at a familiar topic. She describes her research regarding the role of changing attitudes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) in three Central Asian countries. Dr. Joshi discusses what she has learned about the context in which IPV occurs in these countries and its impact on help-seeking and reporting behavior of the women who live there.

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Episode 84 - Dr. Joshua Miller: Connection and Hope: Psychosocial Capacity Building in Response to Disasters

Interviewer: Lisa Butler, PhD

Monday, November 14, 2011, 12:11:35 PM

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In this episode, Dr. Joshua Miller discusses the many types of disasters that affect people around the world and how to help individuals and communities recover. He highlights the social ecology of disaster and the consequences of different types of disasters on individuals, families, and communities. Dr. Miller proposes an alternative to traditional, individually-focused mental health approaches, called Psychosocial Capacity Building, which is multi-systemic and addresses collective cultural orientations and helps foster access to the social support and connections that exist in groups and communities.

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Episode 76 - Dr. Patricia Shannon: Peeling the Fear from the Past: Building Community Capacities for Healing Refugee Trauma as a Human Rights Strategy

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD, MSW

Monday, July 25, 2011, 9:01:45 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Patricia Shannon discusses her research related to the impact of war trauma and torture on the mental health of resettling refugee communities. Our guest describes research on the state of mental health screening practices based on a recent national survey and findings from her recent focus groups on the mental health of Karen, Bhutanese, Oromo and Somali refugees. Dr. Shannon describes efforts to develop community capacity for meeting the mental health needs of refugees and how community based healing can be utilized as a strategy to address the larger context of international human rights.

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Episode 73 - Dr. Rebecca Thomas and Dr. Jill Witmer Sinha: Microcredit, Women Entrepreneurs, and Nonprofits in Kolkata: Social Work's Local and International Role

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, June 13, 2011, 8:32:24 AM

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Microfinance is recognized as an anti-poverty tool and a conduit for financial assistance and capacity building. In their research, Drs. Rebecca Thomas and Jill Witmer Sinha examine differences between the benefits provided by nonprofit and for-profit microfinance institutions specifically as they pertain to women. Drs. Thomas and Sinha present findings from a case study of one program in Kolkata, India highlighting the array of complementary services offered to microloan clients and their potential for bridging the gap between the "haves and have-nots."

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Episode 70 - Dr. David Patterson, Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya): Promoting Wellness and Challenging Cultural Narratives in Native American Communities

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 02, 2011, 8:19:00 AM

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In this episode, Dr. David Patterson describes the Three Sisters and other core ideas that informed the creation and evolution of the Native American Center for Wellness Research. This discussion explores how the Center builds programs that enhance the educational experiences of Native American students, researches and promotes Native American wellness, and collaborates in peace and social justice ceremonies in the community.

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Episode 53 - Dr. Raphael Travis, Jr. and Dr. Anne Deepak: Empowerment in Context: Lessons from Hip Hop Culture for Social Work Practice

Interviewer: Peter Sobota, LCSW

Monday, August 23, 2010, 10:20:58 AM

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In this episode, Drs. Raphael Travis and Anne Deepak discuss using Hip Hop as a framework for understanding client populations and educating social work students.

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Episode 47 - Dr. Caitlin Ryan: Commitment, Intentionality, and Hard Work: What It Takes To Do Culturally Competent, Ground-Breaking Research

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD, MSSA

Tuesday, June 01, 2010, 9:32:14 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Caitlin Ryan discusses the challenges of breaking ground in new areas of research, especially work that may be considered controversial, and what it takes to do work that is culturally and linguistically appropriate. The conversation ends with advice for those interested in following similar lines of research.

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Episode 46 - Dr. Leopoldo Cabassa: Developing Mental Health Literacy Tools for the Latino Community

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 17, 2010, 9:48:18 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Leopoldo Cabassa discusses his research and development of culturally competent interventions for Latinos experiencing mental health issues. He describes his motivation to work with the Latino community and the social work practice implications in developing mental health literacy tools for them.

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Episode 44 - Dr. Lani Jones: Rebuilding Strength Among Black Women: An Evidence-Based, Culturally Congruent Group Intervention

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, April 19, 2010, 10:12:12 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Lani V. Jones discusses her research in the area of evidence-based practice with a focus on psychosocial competence, group work, and positive mental health outcomes with Black women accessing services in mental health settings.

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Episode 30 - Dr. Paul Smokowski: Acculturation and Adjustment in Latino Adolescents: How Cultural Risk Factors and Assets Influence Adolescent Mental Health

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, October 05, 2009, 12:21:44 PM

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In this podcast, Dr. Paul Smokowski describes his current research exploring the protective and risk factors involved for Latino youth as they attempt to integrate into United States culture. Discover what he learned about the "Critical Aspects of Acculturation" for this fast-growing population.

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Episode 16 - Dr. Wooksoo Kim: Drinking Behavior Among Elderly Korean Immigrants

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, March 23, 2009, 11:50:30 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Wooksoo Kim discusses her research on alcohol use among elderly Korean immigrants in Toronto, Canada.

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Episode 13 - Dr. Erik Nisbet: International Conflict and Social Identity: The Influence of Mass Media on "Us vs. Them" Thinking

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, February 09, 2009, 12:29:09 PM

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Dr. Erik Nisbet discusses how perceptions of international conflict and terrorism across national contexts are shaped by the interplay of mass media frames and social identity schema. Dr. Nisbet describes the parallel processes that occur in the United States and the Muslim world.

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Episode 11 - Dr. Shelly Wiechelt: Cultural and Historical Trauma: Affecting Lives for Generations

Interviewer: Susan Green, LCSW

Monday, January 12, 2009, 12:03:52 PM

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People experience trauma in varying ways, from both trauma that occurs within their own lives, to trauma that is transmitted to them from cultural, historical, and intergenerational experiences. In this podcast, Dr. Shelly Wiechelt defines cultural, intergenerational, and historical trauma and discusses its impact on the lives of individuals and their communities.

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Episode 9 - Dr. Hilary Weaver: Culturally Competent Supervision

Monday, December 15, 2008, 10:50:04 AM

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This episode features Dr. Hilary Weaver speaking at the Fourth International Interdisciplinary Conference on Clinical Supervision, convened in Buffalo, NY, Spring 2008. Dr. Weaver discusses diversity issues in the context of supervision, highlighting the Transactional Model of Identity and the critical role supervisors have in promoting, modeling, and developing cultural competence within human service organizations.

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Episode 6 - Dr. Karen Sowers: Social Work at its Roots: Using Microenterprise to Promote Health, Social Welfare, and Community Building Among Street Children in Indonesia

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 03, 2008, 10:44:03 AM

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Dr. Catherine Dulmus, Director of the Buffalo Center for Social Research, speaks with Dr. Karen Sowers, Dean of the College of Social Work at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, about a project aimed at developing microenterprise among street children in Indonesia.

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DISCLAIMER: The content shared by the presenter(s) and/or interviewer(s) of each podcast is their own and not necessarily representative of any views, research, or practice from the UB School of Social Work or the inSocialWork® podcast series.

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