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inSocialWork® is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice and practice to research. inSocialWork® features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.

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Episode 17 - Dr. Sandra Lane: Structural Violence and Disparities in Health

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Episode 229 - Dr. Lauren Reed: Digital Dating Abuse Among Adolescents: Understanding the Role of Gender and Developing Effective Strategies for Prevention

Interviewer: Carol Scott, MSW

Monday, December 04, 2017, 8:05:59 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Lauren Reed discusses her research on digital dating abuse among adolescents and why females are differentially impacted by this form of dating violence. She describes how the use of participatory action research has led to effective prevention strategies, and highlights the need to include digital media when assessing for dating violence.

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Episode 227 - Dr. Kristie Seelman: Sexual Minority Older Adults: Addressing Health Disparities and Promoting Healthy Aging

Interviewer: Louanne Bakk, PhD

Monday, November 06, 2017, 7:53:57 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Kristie Seelman discusses the unique challenges that lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adults face, as well as the need for services that are culturally competent and account for their unique realities. She describes her current research emphasizing coping strategies and differences in mental, cognitive, and physical health among sexual minority older persons.

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Episode 225 - Dr. Joy Learman: Gender-Based Violence and HIV Infection: Experiences of HIV-Positive African Immigrant Women

Interviewer: Eusebius Small, PhD

Monday, October 09, 2017, 7:43:57 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Joy Learman describes the underlying dynamics that can increase a woman's risk of being HIV-positive and failing to obtain treatment. She discusses her research involving contextual factors and personal experiences of HIV-positive African immigrant women. Dr. Learman emphasizes the need for support for at-risk groups and the development of policies that promote women's reproductive health and decrease their risk of HIV.

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Episode 221 - Dr. Jennifer Cullen and Dr. Jolynn Haney: Understanding and Treating Autism in Women: Using Lived Experiences to Shape Practice

Interviewer: Gretchen Bennett, MA

Monday, August 14, 2017, 7:28:52 AM

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In this episode, our guests Dr. Jennifer Cullen and Dr. Jolynn Haney discuss gender differences in the diagnosis and treatment of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the reasons why obtaining an accurate diagnosis may be difficult for females. They describe their research involving the socialization process of women diagnosed with ASD within an online community and how social workers can more effectively assist these individuals.

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Episode 219 - Beth Kanter: The Happy, Healthy Nonprofit: Creating a Self-Care Culture Within the Workplace

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD

Monday, July 03, 2017, 7:31:02 AM

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In this episode, Beth Kanter, author of "The Happy, Healthy Nonprofit," offers strategies to help both individuals and nonprofit organizations obtain impact without burnout and create a culture of self-care within the workplace. She discusses creative techniques to promote organizational changes that are designed to advance employees' well-being.

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Episode 217 - Kimberly Washington: Therapeutic Patient Navigation: Filling the Gaps for Clients with Neurodegenerative Disorders

Interviewer: Louanne Bakk, PhD

Monday, June 05, 2017, 9:26:00 AM

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In this episode, our guest Kimberly Washington of the St. Jude's Project at Catholic Charities in Washington, D.C. discusses her "Therapeutic Patient Navigation" community-based project. She describes how this evidence-based intervention was developed to fill the gaps in services that support patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Alzheimer's diseases.

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Episode 215 - Dr. Henry Louis Taylor Jr.: The Economics of Urban Segregation (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Caitlin Beck

Monday, May 08, 2017, 7:57:42 AM

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In this episode, the second of a two-part discussion on the economics of urban segregation, Dr. Henry Louis Taylor introduces the concept of the "just city." He illustrates the contrasts between the just city and the underdeveloped urban communities that permeate the United States today. He also outlines the important role that social work must play in the development of just communities. Finally, using his research and experience in Cuba as a framework, Dr. Taylor describes how a society with very limited resources has been able to create highly developed communities to meet the needs of its inhabitants and, in doing so, place people over profits.

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Episode 213 - Dr. Henry Louis Taylor Jr.: The Economics of Urban Segregation (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Caitlin Beck

Monday, April 10, 2017, 7:40:37 AM

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With over 80 percent of Americans living in urban areas, it is crucial for social workers to consider how the development of cities in the United States has played a role in creating and maintaining the social and economic segregation that is so deeply woven into the fabric of most cities today. In the first of two episodes, Dr. Henry Louis Taylor argues that there is an intentionality to how cities are built that produces the "underdeveloped" neighborhoods that we see, where marginalized populations find themselves forced to live. Further, institutions put into place to solve the problems facing these communities are failing in their mission and have shifted to simply easing the suffering and misery of the communities' inhabitants.

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Episode 211 - Sarah Beck Buchanan, Wright Kaminer, and Dr. Roger Nooe: The Community Law Office: An Integration of Social Work and Criminal Defense

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, March 13, 2017, 7:32:43 AM

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In the United States, there are more than ten million criminal arrests each year. It is well known that many of those arrested also have a number of personal and environmental issues that not only shape their daily lives but can also be influential in their arrests and affect their defense and sentencing. In this episode, Sarah Beck Buchanan, Wright Kaminer, and Dr. Roger Nooe of the Knox County Public Defender's Office discuss their program, which has social workers working in collaboration with public defense attorneys with the goal of producing better legal outcomes by addressing the psychosocial needs of their clients.

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Episode 205 - Dr. Joseph Richardson and Dr. Christopher St. Vil: Who Shot Ya?: A Novel Hospital-Based Violence Intervention Program

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz

Monday, December 05, 2016, 8:13:44 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Joseph Richardson and Dr. Christopher St. Vil discuss their use of a longitudinal, ethnographic study of young Black men admitted to the hospital for treatment of violent injury to inform development of a hospital-based violence intervention program. They also report on research that they have conducted to better understand nonfatal use of force by police. From the findings of these two studies, they offer specific recommendations that have implications for programs as well as policy.

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Episode 202 - Dr. Wonhyung Lee, Meera Bhat, and Nurul Widyaningrum: Microfinance in India, Indonesia, and the United States: Implications for Social Work

Interviewer: Shaanta Murshid, PhD

Monday, October 24, 2016, 7:37:00 AM

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Scholarly literature and practice experience have shown that low-income people around the world can use credit responsibly, make timely payments, and save to make their lives more manageable. In this episode, Dr. Wonhyung Lee, Meera Bhat, and Nurul Widyaningrum discuss the range of financial services called microfinance, which provides low-income persons access to affordable and quality financial services to promote empowerment and the building of assets.

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Episode 200 - Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault: Enhancing Relationships Forums: People and Law Enforcement Agencies Moving Change Forward

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, September 26, 2016, 7:40:54 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault discuss their response to the widening divide between the African-American community and law enforcement officials. Following the killings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice, as well as NYPD officers Rafeal Ramos and Wenjian Liu, our guests developed a working group and an action plan. Enhancing Relationships Forums is the tangible result, and it brings together representatives of law enforcement personnel, the Social Work profession, members of the African-American community, and the community at large for empathic dialog. Here, they describe the process, lessons learned, and recommendations for community action in communities everywhere.

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Episode 197 - Dr. Larry Davis: "Why Are They Angry with Us?": A Discussion on Race and Racism in America

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD

Monday, August 15, 2016, 7:41:35 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Larry Davis engages in a wide-ranging discussion on race and racism in America. The topics he addresses include his use of cognitive dissonance theory to understand racism and racist behavior. He explores how implicit racism affects all members of American society and defines a concept he refers to as "relative deprivation." Dr. Davis also explains why multiculturalism is insufficient as the principal method of addressing racism.

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Episode 194 - Dr. David Brennan: Online Sexual Health Outreach for Gay and Bisexual Men: Providers' Perspectives

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, June 20, 2016, 7:40:40 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. David Brennan talks about his work in the development and evaluation of online outreach to address issues of gay and bisexual men’s health. To highlight this work, Dr. Brennan describes CRUISElab, a research lab focused on gay and bisexual men's health. He also talks about the "Cruising Counts" study, which has been essential in developing new guidelines for online health outreach to gay men in Ontario.

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Episode 192 - Dr. Caroline Long Burry: "No One Asked About My Children": Voices of Incarcerated Mothers

Interviewer: Patricia Logan-Greene, PhD

Monday, May 23, 2016, 9:42:09 AM

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A report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics showed that from 1991 to 2007 the number of incarcerated mothers increased by a startling one hundred and thirty-one percent. In this podcast, Dr. Caroline Long Burry discusses a pilot study she conducted with these parents with the hope of better understanding their parenting experiences. Also explored are the mothers' attempts to negotiate the criminal justice system while in their role as parents.

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Episode 186 - Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone: The Anti-Racism Project: A Strategy for Preparing Social Work Educators

Interviewer: Berg Miller, MSW

Monday, February 29, 2016, 8:52:37 AM

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The NASW Code of Ethics and International Federation of Social Workers’ "Statement of Ethical Principles" call for social workers to challenge discrimination, oppression, and "unjust policies and practices." In the United States, racism remains a lasting and pernicious example of those injustices. In this podcast, Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone describe the development of their Anti-Racism Project. The discussion includes their experience as the Project's facilitators and group members, research connected to the Project, and their advocacy for the need to include equity work in social work doctoral education. They also identify four important themes that seemed to emanate from their work.

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Episode 178 - Dr. Devonya Havis: "Stand Your Ground" Legislation and Implications for State-Sponsored Racism

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, October 26, 2015, 7:50:57 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Devonya Havis describes how "Stand Your Ground" legislation, intended to safeguard our society's most vulnerable members, has been utilized in ways that perpetuate and even exacerbate existing disparities experienced by persons of color. She discusses implicit bias, the bidirectional relationship between blackness and crime, "reasonable belief", and how these forces combine to shape individual behavior as well as societal institutions and systems.

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Episode 169 - Kathrine Bisanz: Social Workers for Reproductive Justice

Interviewer: Gretchen Ely, PhD

Monday, June 08, 2015, 7:23:43 AM

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Reproductive justice is a framework grounded in international human rights that seeks to increase social, political, and economic power and resources so that people can make healthy decisions about gender, sexuality, and families for themselves and their communities. In this episode, Katherine Bisanz, co-founder of Social Workers for Reproductive Justice, describes the organization's mission and the role of social work in this movement.

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Episode 165 - Dr. James Mulvale: Basic Income: An Anti-Poverty Strategy for Social Work

Interviewer: Gretchen Ely, PhD

Monday, April 13, 2015, 9:34:35 AM

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In this episode, Dr. James Mulvale explains the idea of a basic income. He offers reasons for instituting a basic income and reviews some of the typical objections. Dr. Mulvale also provides a rationale for why this is an anti-poverty model that social work should embrace.

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Episode 164 - Dr. Richard Smith: A Social Worker's Report from the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development

Interviewer: Shaanta Murshid, PhD

Monday, March 30, 2015, 9:08:45 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Richard Smith describes his attendance and experiences at the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Highlighting Social Work's long history of working to improve environmental conditions, end poverty, and foster social development, Dr. Smith discusses the conference's takeaways and the implications for social work practice.

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Episode 158 - Dr. Danilea Werner: Social Workers' Preparedness for School and Community Crisis

Interviewer: Lisa Caprio, LMSW

Monday, January 05, 2015, 7:45:51 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Danilea Werner argues that social workers, especially those who work in school settings, are on he front line of response to school and community crisis events. She discusses her research with school social workers, examining their perceptions of their own and their district's preparedness for crisis events. Dr. Werner recommends how school social workers can increase their own preparedness and their confidence in their district colleagues' ability to respond effectively.

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Episode 154 - Dr. Toba Kerson and Dr. Judith McCoyd: In Response to Need: An Analysis of Social Work Roles Over Time

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, October 27, 2014, 11:08:03 AM

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In this episode, based on a research article published in the journal Social Work in 2013, Drs. Toba Kerson and Judith McCoyd discuss their latest work re-examining interviews conducted in 1976 with the pioneers of health-related social work. They compare those with themes they identified with current workers in the healthcare field and describe how the distinctive way that social workers respond to needs remains consistent with our core values and skill set.

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Episode 153 - Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Laurie Cook Heffron: Modern Slavery: Social Work's Role in Addressing Human Trafficking

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, October 13, 2014, 8:04:28 AM

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The United Nations Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking estimates that there as many as 2.5 million people in forced labor at any given time. The U.S. State Department estimates that between 600,000 and 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year. There may be as many as 27 million slaves in the world today. In this episode, Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Ms. Laurie Cook Heffron examine these disturbing issues and describe social work's role in addressing them.

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Episode 152 - Dr. Mimi Abramovitz: Changes in U.S. Social Welfare Policy: The Effects of Privatization on Human Services (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, September 29, 2014, 8:47:48 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Mimi Abramovitz continues her discussion of the rise of New Public Management (NPM) and the privatization of human services. She concludes by discussing her research on the impact of NPM on persons in the front lines of human service agencies and the services they provide.

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Episode 150 - Dr. Mimi Abramovitz: Changes in U.S. Social Welfare Policy: The Effects of Privatization on Human Services (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, September 01, 2014, 5:45:56 PM

Image of Dr. Mimi Abramovitz

In this episode, Dr. Mimi Abramovitz discusses the privatization of human services and the rise of New Public Management. She reviews evolving economic conditions, historical changes in U.S. social welfare policy, and the subsequent impact on human service agencies, their workforce and, ultimately, the clients they serve.

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Episode 148 - Dr. Erin Kelly: Workplace Violence and Staff Well-Being: Everyday Hassles and Acute Crises

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz

Monday, August 04, 2014, 8:16:42 AM

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While working at an inpatient psychiatric facility early in her career, Dr. Erin Kelly became interested in workplace violence, struck by the tension of maintaining staff and patient safety. She also developed an appreciation of the importance of building relationships with patients and other staff in such a challenging environment. In this episode, Dr. Kelly discusses her research on the impact of workplace violence on staff at a large psychiatric hospital. Dr. Kelly suggests a number of strategies to ameliorate staff conflict as one method of reducing staff-patient conflict. She also makes suggestions for the individual clinicians working in settings with elevated levels of conflict.

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Episode 147 - Dr. Rukshan Fernando and Andy Germak: Social Entrepreneurship as a Social Work Practice

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, July 07, 2014, 9:57:36 AM

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When asked about the word "entrepreneurship," most people are likely to think about business-oriented activities, perhaps, more specifically, using business innovation as a route to develop or enhance a business enterprise. However, most people probably have not considered using social consciousness as a foundation for engaging in entrepreneurial activities. In this podcast, Professors Rukshan Fernando and Andy Germak will explore using entrepreneurship as a method to address social change.

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Episode 146 - Dr. Venus Tsui: The Invisible Ones: Male Survivors of Intimate Partner Abuse

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:36:36 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Venus Tsui describes the pervasive shame that male victims of intimate partner abuse experience and their common belief that the services that do exist aren't built for them. The resulting alienation and hopelessness present powerful barriers to seeking support. Dr. Tsui describes the extent to which existing services are utilized by men and which formal and informal helpers they find most beneficial.

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Episode 145 - Jorien Brock and Siobhan Fitzgerald-Cushing: Meeting the Health Needs of Transgender People

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, June 09, 2014, 9:31:38 AM

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According to the National Center for Transgender Equality, people who identify as transgender are estimated to comprise between one quarter and one percent of the U.S. population. Often targeted for overt discrimination, a transgender person may, rightly, feel the need to protect themselves from the intolerant or rejecting responses they are subjected to. However, the need to be open and engaged is critical to ensure appropriate health care. In this episode, members of the Pride Center of Western New York discuss how the Center's Transgender Health Initiative meets the health care needs of transgender people.

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Episode 142 - Chandran Chetan: Action and Empowerment in India: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, April 28, 2014, 8:41:06 AM

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In this episode, Chandran Chetan continues our previous discussion of India's "invisible maids" and the human trafficking that is fostered by the demand for these workers. Here, our guest describes how the National Domestic Workers Movement builds institutional support for the workers and how they promote social action and change through the direct participation of the women in speaking out on their own behalf. Fr. Chetan highlights the movement's work in organization and unionization activities and outlines the current activity and challenges on behalf of this exploited population.

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Episode 140 - Christin Mary: India's Invisible Maids: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, March 31, 2014, 8:08:27 AM

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In this episode, Christin Mary of the National Domestic Workers Movement describes her work advocating, organizing, and participating in social action to empower exploited domestic workers in India. Young women, typically from impoverished rural areas, are trafficked into cities, where their human rights are violated. Our guest describes her organization's efforts in organizing and empowering these women, as well as the legislative successes they have realized.

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Episode 136 - Dr. Brian Kelly: Superman in the Smallest Place: Exploring a Music Studio for Young People Experiencing Homelessness

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz

Monday, February 03, 2014, 8:27:48 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Brian Kelly describes his experience and research with homeless youth. Specifically, he looks into the effectiveness of utilizing a music studio in a transitional living program to engage young people's strengths and promote their resilience.

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Episode 131 - Dr. Toni Miles: Health Care Policy: Medicaid Expansion and the Affordable Care Act

Interviewer: Nancy Kusmaul, LMSW, PhD

Monday, November 11, 2013, 8:20:55 AM

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Created in 1965, Medicaid, a form of health insurance, was developed to address the health care needs of low-income families as well as individuals who had a disability, were blind, or were aged. Recently, Medicaid is undergoing change. With the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid offers the opportunity for expanding eligibility. In this episode, Dr. Toni P. Miles discusses health care policy, Medicaid expansion, and the Affordable Care Act.

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Episode 126 - Dr. Jodi Jacobson Frey and Robin McKinney: Financial Social Work: Advancing the Economic Stability and Capability of Individuals, Families, and Communities

Interviewer: Peter Sobota, LCSW

Monday, September 02, 2013, 10:02:28 AM

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In this episode, our guests Dr. Jodi Jacobson Frey and Robin McKinney discuss their work with the Financial Social Work Initiative at the University of Maryland School of Social Work and the Maryland CASH Campaign. They discuss how social workers can work to improve and sustain clients’ financial capability, while collaborating with community members and professionals from a variety of disciplines, to improve economic conditions for individuals and communities through direct practice, advocacy, policy development, and research.

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Episode 125 - Dr. Michael Reisch: The State of Social Work Education (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary N. Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, August 19, 2013, 9:03:02 AM

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In this episode, the first of two parts, Dr. Michael Reisch describes the role that social work education has in facilitating the emerging professional’s understanding of the institutional and structural inequalities facing oppressed and disenfranchised people. He also discusses the necessity for social work to reconnect with its historical mission of directly addressing social injustice.

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Episode 124 - Amanda Hunsaker: Advances in Dementia Diagnostic Technology: Preparing Social Work for a Changing Practice

Interviewer: Rachel Rotach, MSW

Monday, August 05, 2013, 9:25:28 AM

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In this episode, Amanda Hunsaker discusses the current landscape related to the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's Disease and how advances in diagnostic technology associated with dementia will provide the potential for new insights in the care of these patients. Challenges and opportunities for social work practice are reviewed.

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Episode 123 - Christine Scott: Shadow Grief: Perinatal Loss and Bereavement

Interviewer: Rebecca S. Rouland Polmanteer, MSW

Monday, July 08, 2013, 9:24:17 AM

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In this episode, Christine Scott defines perinatal loss and discusses the impact of perinatal bereavement on the parents and family. Using her personal experience with this type loss as a backdrop, Ms. Scott describes the effect of perinatal bereavement on the individual and family, and offers suggestions for the social work response at all three levels of practice.

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Episode 121 - Dr. Christina Sogar: Beyond Diagnosis: The Dynamics of Disability and Disruptions in Parenting

Interviewer: Kathleen A. Knaak, LMSW

Monday, June 10, 2013, 9:18:57 AM

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It has been suggested that there are between 4.1 and 9 million parents who have a disability. In this episode, Dr. Christina Sogar discusses how characteristics of disability (e.g., onset and symptom variability) impact and shape the parenting process and can increase the likelihood of child welfare involvement.

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Episode 119 - Dr. Dona Reese: "A Friendly Face:" Addressing Barriers to Hospice Care for African American Clients by Hiring African American Social Workers

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 13, 2013, 8:59:13 AM

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The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization reported that in 2011 over a million and a half people utilized hospice services in the United States. In this podcast, Dr. Dona Reese talks about the lack of utilization of hospice care by African American patients. This includes identifying variables that influence African American hospice use. One of those barriers is the almost complete absence of African American staff or volunteers in hospices across the nation. Dr. Reese describes a field placement and community intervention project that was a successful first step in accomplishing the goal of increasing African American staff. Additionally, she offers her thoughts on what must be done to expand the number of African American social work professionals in hospice settings.

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Episode 116 - Dr. Janet Joiner: Cyberbullying and Cyber Social Work

Interviewer: Anthony Guzman, MISM, MNCM

Monday, April 01, 2013, 9:02:37 AM

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The internet and social media have created numerous new opportunities for communication, relationships, and learning. Opportunities for the misuse of this technology have accompanied the popularity of these media. In this episode, Dr. Janet Joiner discusses her work with cyberbullying behavior and addresses how modern technology can be integrated safely and productively into social work practice and education.

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Episode 114 - Dr. Alexa Smith-Osborne and Dr. Jayshree Jani: 'Cyber-Marriage': Wartime Military Relationships and Partners' Perceptions of the Impact of Telecommunications

Interviewer: Lisa Butler, PhD

Monday, March 04, 2013, 8:23:30 AM

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In this episode, Drs. Alexa Smith-Osborne and Jayshree Jani discuss their work studying the impact of technological advances in communications on relationships experiencing separation related to military deployment. Focusing on the perspective of the female partners, our guests contrast the experiences of the target population with those of civilian women in long-distance relationships. Protective factors as well as risk factors of the multiple modes of communication are explored.

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Episode 113 - Dr. Barbara Jones: Adolescent Cancer Survivors: Identity Paradox and the Need to Belong

Interviewer: Anthony Guzman, MISM, MNCM

Monday, February 18, 2013, 8:54:38 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Barbara Jones discusses the developmental and psychosocial effects of cancer on adolescents and young adults. Dr. Jones speaks to the need to understand the unique needs of the adolescent and young adult. She also explains how these unique needs can complicate the continuum of care as well as important developmental processes. Further, Dr. Jones suggests strategies of intervention to consider when working with this population.

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Episode 112 - Dr. Sandra Butler: Should I Stay or Should I Go?: Home Care Workers and Factors Affecting Turnover and Retention

Interviewer: Diane Elze, Ph.D.

Monday, February 04, 2013, 9:09:15 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Sandra Butler discusses her work and findings with the Maine Home Healthcare Retention Study. Putting a human face on "the centerpiece of our long-term care system," Dr. Butler describes the predictors of turnover and retention and how the workers themselves describe their jobs. She tells us what she has learned about why these workers stay and why significant numbers of them leave their positions.

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Episode 109 - Dr. Luke Shaefer: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (Food Stamps) and the Material Well-Being of Low-Income Families with Children

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, December 10, 2012, 9:02:00 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Luke Shaefer discusses the effects of the U.S.'s largest means-tested income support program, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program. Recent breakthroughs in research methods have allowed us to better measure these effects, and results suggest that SNAP improves food security among participant households as well as non-food material well-being.

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Episode 108 - Dr. John Brekke, Anthony Fulginiti, and Rohini Pahwa: "For Them, With Them, By Them": A Peer Health Navigator Intervention for Persons with Serious Mental Illness

Interviewer: Anthony Guzman, MISM, MNCM

Monday, November 26, 2012, 8:43:51 AM

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In this episode, Dr. John Brekke, Anthony Fulginiti, and Rohini Pahwa discuss their research with a Peer Health Navigator Intervention aimed at improving the health of persons with serious mental illness. Describing the intervention as a comprehensive engagement and self-management approach, our guests highlight what makes the intervention unique, recent findings from its application, and its benefits for the Peer Navigators as well.

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Episode 107 - Dr. Allan Barsky: Ethical Issues in End-of-Life Decision Making

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, November 12, 2012, 8:06:53 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Allan Barsky focuses on ethical issues in end-of-life decision making. In order to assist clients and families with end-of-life choices, Dr. Barsky argues that social workers need to be aware of ethical issues that may arise in relation to self-determination, informed consent, mental capacity, and principles such as the sanctity of life, client autonomy, and judicious management of resources. He discusses a model for engaging clients, family members, and co-professionals in discussions and problem-solving processes when conflict about end-of-life decision making arises.

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Episode 106 - Dr. Yunju Nam: Asset-Based Policy: A New Direction in Social Welfare Policy

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, October 29, 2012, 9:30:50 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Yunju Nam describes her research in Asset-Based Policy, an alternative to our current income maintenance policies that attempt to respond to the needs of social welfare recipients. She describes how this new paradigm addresses the long term needs of persons living in or near poverty. In addition, Dr. Nam discusses the psychological benefit that asset ownership has on a person's hope, motivation, and quality of life.

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Episode 104 - Dr. Rachel Fusco: Developmental and Mental Health Screening in Child Welfare: Implications for Young Children in Rural Settings

Interviewer: Rebecca S.R. Polmanteer, MSW

Monday, October 01, 2012, 9:12:04 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Rachel Fusco describes her work with Universal Screening that involves an examination of the developmental and mental health needs of young children involved in the child welfare system. After sharing what she is learning from this research, she discusses the implications for child welfare-involved children and families in rural communities.

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Episode 102 - Bruce Nisbet, LMSW: Health Homes: A Virtual Home of Care Coordination for Medicaid Enrollees with Chronic Conditions

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Tuesday, September 04, 2012, 8:09:59 AM

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In this episode, Bruce Nisbet discusses Spectrum Human Services' involvement with Health Homes, a Medicaid health program providing integrated and coordinated services to people in the community who have serious and persistent mental illness or two or more physical health conditions. Mr. Nisbet discusses the inception of the program, services offered, the program's relevance, and implications for social work practice and education.

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Episode 99 - Dr. Shelley Craig and Dr. Barbara Muskat: "Bouncers and Jugglers and Firefighters ... Oh My!": A Qualitative Investigation of Social Work Roles in Health

Interviewer: Joan Doris, DSW

Monday, June 25, 2012, 7:33:45 AM

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In this episode, Drs. Craig and Muskat discuss their qualitative study of social work roles in hospital settings. Seven major roles emerged from their analysis: bouncer, juggler, janitor, broker, firefighter, glue, and challenger. Drs. Craig and Muskat draw attention to the importance of understanding and articulating the value added by professionally trained social workers toward understanding and addressing the social determinants of health.

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Episode 89 - Dr. Eugene Walls: School Engagement Among Sexual Minority Students: Allies, Alliances, and Academic Outcomes

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD, MSSA

Monday, February 06, 2012, 8:29:45 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. Eugene Walls discusses his research on school engagement among sexual minority students. His research is aimed at understanding the contributing roles of school climate, adult allies, and gay-straight alliances in predicting academic outcomes.

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Episode 88 - Dr. Manisha Joshi: Attitudes Toward Intimate Partner Violence Among Women in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD, MSW

Monday, January 23, 2012, 8:03:52 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Manisha Joshi utilizes a unique lens to look at a familiar topic. She describes her research regarding the role of changing attitudes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) in three Central Asian countries. Dr. Joshi discusses what she has learned about the context in which IPV occurs in these countries and its impact on help-seeking and reporting behavior of the women who live there.

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Episode 86 - Dr. Nicole Ruggiano: Doing It Their Way: Consumer-Directed Long-Term Care

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, December 12, 2011, 9:02:12 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Nicole Ruggiano discusses a client-driven and self-directed approach to consumers' long term health care, providing an alternative to traditional, agency-provided and managed care. She describes the positive outcomes related to the consumer-directed model and anticipates the barriers and costs in embracing the approach.

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Episode 82 - Dr. Jeffrey Edleson: Domestic Violence in the Lives of Children (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Margaret Coombes, PhD

Monday, October 17, 2011, 8:24:53 AM

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Dr. Jeffrey Edleson, a nationally known researcher in the field of domestic violence and its effect on children, concludes his discussion by interpreting longitudinal research related to the impact of early exposure to violence and risk factors influencing future experience with violence. He explains the "comprehensive community response" to children who are exposed to DV and the potential protective factors that can be utilized in communities.

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Episode 81 - Jessica Greenawalt: Using Social Capital to Achieve Goals in a Low-Income, Immigrant Community

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, October 03, 2011, 8:41:53 AM

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Jessica Greenawalt discusses her work with the Chelsea Collaborative Social Capital Campaign to improve community-level outcomes. The Collaborative used participatory action research methods to assess the community's needs and develop initiatives to meet those needs through civic engagement.

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Episode 80 - Dr. Jeffrey Edleson: Domestic Violence in the Lives of Children (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Margaret Coombes, PhD

Monday, September 19, 2011, 8:02:02 AM

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Dr. Jeffrey Edleson of the University of Minnesota is well known for his research on adult domestic violence, particularly how it affects children in the home. In this episode, Dr. Edleson describes his work and that of his colleagues over the past two decades in their efforts to study, raise awareness of, and change both policies and practices focused on children exposed to domestic violence.

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Episode 73 - Dr. Rebecca Thomas and Dr. Jill Witmer Sinha: Microcredit, Women Entrepreneurs, and Nonprofits in Kolkata: Social Work's Local and International Role

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, June 13, 2011, 8:32:24 AM

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Microfinance is recognized as an anti-poverty tool and a conduit for financial assistance and capacity building. In their research, Drs. Rebecca Thomas and Jill Witmer Sinha examine differences between the benefits provided by nonprofit and for-profit microfinance institutions specifically as they pertain to women. Drs. Thomas and Sinha present findings from a case study of one program in Kolkata, India highlighting the array of complementary services offered to microloan clients and their potential for bridging the gap between the "haves and have-nots."

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Episode 72 - Dr. Jan Ivery and Dr. M. Lori Thomas: Aging in Place on the Streets: Homelessness Among Older Adults

Interviewer: Nancy Kusmaul, LMSW

Tuesday, May 31, 2011, 8:14:14 AM

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Drs. Jan Ivery and M. Lori Thomas discuss the findings of their research with the often overlooked older adult homeless population. Our guests describe the challenges of meeting the unique needs of this population and the contradictions that are raised as the older adult homeless population burgeons.

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Episode 70 - Dr. David Patterson, Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya): Promoting Wellness and Challenging Cultural Narratives in Native American Communities

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 02, 2011, 8:19:00 AM

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In this episode, Dr. David Patterson describes the Three Sisters and other core ideas that informed the creation and evolution of the Native American Center for Wellness Research. This discussion explores how the Center builds programs that enhance the educational experiences of Native American students, researches and promotes Native American wellness, and collaborates in peace and social justice ceremonies in the community.

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Episode 64 - Dr. Anna Santiago, Dr. George Galster, and Renee Nicolosi: Where People Live Matters: Using Housing Policy as an Anti-Poverty and Asset-Building Intervention

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD, MS

Monday, February 07, 2011, 9:56:54 AM

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In this episode, our guests discuss their research that attempts to respond to and understand how housing policy influences not only its clients, but the neighborhoods in which they reside. They describe, amongst other programs, the Home Ownership Program in Denver, Colorado; their longitudinal research; their findings; and the continuing challenges to sustaining home ownership and its effect on poverty.

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Episode 63 - Dr. Faye Mishna: Bullying in the Cyber Yard: Old Problems, New Contexts

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD, MSW

Monday, January 24, 2011, 10:17:58 AM

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Dr. Faye Mishna discusses her research on cyber bullying among youth, its prevalence, its effects, and what social workers can do to begin to address this growing problem.

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Episode 62 - Dr. Jay Wolfson: Head, Heart, and Hope: The Complex Challenges of Decision-Making at End of Life

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, January 10, 2011, 9:46:33 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Jay Wolfson discusses his experience and reflections serving as guardian ad litem for Terri Schiavo, the young woman whose case captured the nation's attention in 2003. Dr. Wolfson describes the clinical, political, and legal issues he encountered and the complex drama between the head (science) and the heart (hope) present as families and professionals make critical decisions that affect the life (and death) of others.

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Episode 61 - Dr. Lenore Walker: The System is Broken: Challenges to Trauma-Informed Approaches with Parents and Children Affected by Domestic Violence

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD, MSW

Monday, December 13, 2010, 8:22:30 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Lenore Walker discusses the current social, political, and legal dynamics that challenge a trauma-informed approach to the health and safety of children affected by domestic violence. Dr. Charles Ewing of the University at Buffalo Law School joins in the conversation.

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Episode 60 - Alankaar Sharma: Tuskegee and the Negro Project: The Intersections of Race, Gender, and Public Health (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 29, 2010, 8:33:52 AM

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This is the second of two episodes in which Alankaar Sharma discusses his work comparing and contrasting the well-known Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments and the lesser known Negro Project, both intended to further knowledge related to prevention and reducing the extent of sexually transmitted disease in African-American men. Here, Mr. Sharma concludes his discussion by attempting to answer the question, "Why the immense difference in support and time between the two studies?" He concludes with comments about African-American access to health care services today, and "post-racial" America.

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Episode 58 - Alankaar Sharma: Tuskegee and the Negro Project: The Intersections of Race, Gender, and Public Health (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 01, 2010, 11:22:31 AM

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From Tuskegee to current revelations of U.S. experiments in Guatemala in the 1940's, public health research and interventions have been impacted by intersections with race and gender. This is the first of two episodes in which Alankaar Sharma discusses his work comparing and contrasting the well-known Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments and the lesser known Negro Project, both intended to further knowledge related to prevention and reducing the extent of sexually transmitted disease in African-American men. Here, he describes the historical context of the studies and how stereotypical and dominant narratives of Black men influenced the research.

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Episode 57 - Dr. Robert Milch and Dr. Donald Shedd: Good Outcomes at the End of Life: The History of Hospice Buffalo

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, October 18, 2010, 10:56:06 AM

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Drs. Robert Milch and Donald Shedd have been leaders in the hospice movement since its early days. In this episode, they discuss the history of hospice and hospice in Buffalo, NY, the challenges of the early days of hospice, changes in hospice care over the years, and what they see as the future of hospice and palliative care.

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Episode 54 - Joyce James, LMSW-AP and Carolyne Rodriguez, MSW: Addressing Disproportionality: Promising Practice Innovations

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, September 06, 2010, 10:39:06 AM

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In this episode, Joyce James of the Texas Department of Family Protective Services and Carolyne Rodriguez of Casey Family Programs' Texas State Strategy systems improvement initiative discuss how their collaboration is addressing disproportionality statewide through promising practices and innovations in undoing racism trainings, values-based leadership development, and community engagement strategies.

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Episode 51 - Dr. Jean Kutner: The Evolution of Evidence-Based Practice in Hospice

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, July 26, 2010, 10:06:34 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Jean Kutner discusses the history and role of evidence-based practice in hospice care, changes in hospice care, and barriers and facilitators to building an evidence base.

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Episode 48 - Robert Whitaker: Rethinking Psychiatric Care: If We Follow the Scientific Evidence, What Must We Do to Better Promote Long-term Recovery?

Interviewer: Amy R. Manning, LMSW, PhD Candidate

Monday, June 14, 2010, 8:08:28 AM

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In this episode, author and journalist Robert Whitaker discusses what he has discovered through study of the evidence that is utilized to guide the treatment of psychiatric illness. With a critical eye, he describes the paradoxes in the conventional wisdom and practice in this field and how faithfully "following the evidence" would transform care for the drug-based treatment of mental illness.

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Episode 36 - Dr. Claude Welch: Spotlight on Human Rights: Economic Rights in the United States

Interviewer: Peter Sobota, LCSW

Monday, December 28, 2009, 8:38:41 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Claude Welch, Jr. explains his contention that human rights can be violated as a result of economic structures. Currently, the issues involved in our response to the economic crisis and U.S. health care reform speak to our society's commitment to protect the human rights of its citizens. Dr. Welch describes the economic conditions that underlie problems such as poverty, housing, and working conditions that create inequality in a wealthy, capitalist society such as the United States.

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Episode 31 - Dr. Nancy Kelley-Gillespie and Dr. Karen Rolf: Too Old To Care?: Older Adult Caregivers and Their Children with Disabilities

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, October 19, 2009, 10:22:14 AM

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Rising life expectancy over the last two decades has resulted in increases in the number of aging parents caring for adult children with disabilities later in life. Drs. Kelley-Gillespie and Rolf discuss their work to understand the needs of these families toward quality of life improvement, better services, and more informed choices for caregivers.

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Episode 22 - Dr. Lori Wiener: Children with HIV/AIDS: Issues Of Survival, Disclosure, and Transition

Interviewer: Robert Keefe, PhD, MSSA

Monday, June 15, 2009, 9:40:04 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. Lori Wiener discusses her decades of work bridging clinical experience with research methodology to address the needs of children with HIV/AIDS and their families. Dr. Wiener offers guidance to helping professionals and families with regard to current challenges associated with survival and transition to adult care, diagnosis disclosure, child and parental adjustment, and child and parental survival.

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Episode 8 - Dr. Deborah Waldrop: End-of-Life Care for Our Nation's Elderly - In Their Own Words (part 3 of 3)

Monday, December 01, 2008, 1:48:30 PM

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This is the third of three episodes in which Dr. Waldrop discusses her research on end-of-life care decision-making begun in 2007. In this episode, Dr Waldrop gives us a status report on the progress she's made in her research on end of life care decision-making and what she has learned thus far, sharing with us participant experiences in their own words.

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Episode 7 - Dr. Deborah Waldrop: End-of-Life Care for Our Nation's Elderly - Methods and Challenges (part 2 of 3)

Monday, November 17, 2008, 12:11:34 PM

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This is the second of three episodes in which Dr. Waldrop discusses her research on end-of-life care decision-making begun in 2007. In this episode, Dr. Waldrop explains her research aims and methodology and some of the challenges to conducting this type of research.

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Episode 6 - Dr. Karen Sowers: Social Work at its Roots: Using Microenterprise to Promote Health, Social Welfare, and Community Building Among Street Children in Indonesia

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 03, 2008, 10:44:03 AM

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Dr. Catherine Dulmus, Director of the Buffalo Center for Social Research, speaks with Dr. Karen Sowers, Dean of the College of Social Work at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, about a project aimed at developing microenterprise among street children in Indonesia.

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Episode 3 - Dr. Robert Keefe: Childhood Lead Poisoning and Repeat Teen Pregnancy

Monday, September 22, 2008, 11:43:11 AM

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Adolescents who become pregnant as teens are likely to become pregnant again before their teen years are over. This episode features Dr. Robert Keefe, Professor at the UB School of Social Work, discussing his preliminary research on childhood lead poisoning and repeat teen pregnancy.

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Episode 2 - Dr. Deborah Waldrop: End-of-Life Care for Our Nation's Elderly - History of Hospice Care (part 1 of 3)

Monday, September 08, 2008, 11:08:35 AM

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This is this first of three episodes in which Dr. Waldrop discusses her research on end-of-life care decision-making begun in 2007. In this episode, Dr. Waldrop explains the personal nature of studying end-of-life care and answers the questions, "What is hospice care?" and "What is its history?"

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DISCLAIMER: The content shared by the presenter(s) and/or interviewer(s) of each podcast is their own and not necessarily representative of any views, research, or practice from the UB School of Social Work or the inSocialWork® podcast series.

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