Reviews

Episode 155 - Dr. Wendy Haight: Caregivers' Moral Narratives of Their African American Children's Out-of-School Suspensions: Implications for Effective Family-School Collaborations

Monday, November 10, 2014, 9:39:43 AM

Image of Wendy Haight, PhD

A report from 2006 indicates that almost three and half million children were suspended or expelled from American schools. Of additional concern is that black students are suspended or expelled at a rate three times that of their white peers. In this podcast, Dr. Wendy Haight explores this problem through the experiences and perceptions of those students' caretakers. Dr. Haight's work provides a different view and offers another opportunity for social work to address this complex problem.

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Average Rating: 4.5 stars (4 listener reviews )

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Average Rating: 5stars  podcast review, Sunday, February 01, 2015

By Natalie L. :

I chose this particular podcast due to my experiences with the school social worker in an inner city elementary school. I am witness to daily suspensions, especially for the African American children, usually because of violent or disrespectful behaviors. I find Dr. Wendy Haight's findings so intriguing when she asked the school staff, students, and caregivers about their views on punishment protocols. I seldom read literature that focuses on what parents and/or guardians think about the school system and any suggested improvements. I agree with Dr. Haight that incorporating additional support and relationships with the child and their family would drastically improve their academic performances. Furthermore, staff and caregivers would no longer feel victimized by one another if they collaborated on individualized plans for bettering the student's academic career. There are so many aspects of this podcast that I could spend all day discussing, particularly about how the school systems utilize terminology and punishment methods similar to that of the criminal justice system, as well as the added problem of racial discrimination. Students are being treated as criminals when what they need most to succeed is not discipline, but more social, emotional, and cognitive support from their peers and authority figures. Similarly, teachers and staff must have some way to cope with their "compassion fatigue" and caregivers are in need of moral and social support from the administration to keep their children from participating in negative lifestyles. I thoroughly enjoyed listening to this podcast and would certainly love to hear more from Dr. Haight on this subject of school suspensions and family-school collaborations.

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Average Rating: 5stars  podcast review, Tuesday, January 27, 2015

By Ariel Harris :

I very much enjoyed listening to this podcast I wasn't aware of the race differential between African American students and other ethnicities. I feel Dr. Haight did a great job at explaining the situation and providing empirical knowledge base of the subject. Dr. Haight utilizing both statistical measures and qualitative data for her research allows for the data to be well rounded. I also felt that her also using structural components and social issues to help her argument assisted with taking it off of being all about race. As race is a touchy subject especially with the current universal outrage towards not mistreatment of African American males in society. While, this podcast doesn't touch on the deaths of Martin, Garner and Brown Haight utilized other factors as contributors to the suspension of these individuals outside of race. As stated teachers with crowded classrooms may have less time to trouble shoot behaviors and really get to know the student which, can increase the child being disruptive. With the proven education gaps in addition to the school and prison pipeline I feel it's more than apparent that there should be other ways to handle issues in school than for suspension. Dr. Haight also discusses how schools are using prison terminology and that the zero tolerance policy while helpful can also promote kids being out of school. Policy and macro issues that arise in urban neighborhoods also contribute to the reactions of the children. I also, found that utilizing parents to help gauge how the suspension impacts the family as a whole was thought provoking. The suspension can cause disequilibrium in the entire household dynamic and cause funds to be lost dependent on childcare among other factors. With more thought on what are some contributing causes to the behavior administrators can find alternate ways to deal with the behaviors.

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Average Rating: 5stars  podcast review, Tuesday, January 27, 2015

By Ariel H :

I very much enjoyed listening to this podcast I wasn't aware of the race differential between African American students and other ethnicities. I feel Dr. Haight did a great job at explaining the situation and providing empirical knowledge base of the subject. Dr. Haight utilizing both statistical measures and qualitative data for her research allows for the data to be well rounded. I also felt that her also using structural components and social issues to help her argument assisted with taking it off of being all about race. As race is a touchy subject especially with the current outrage of wanting “Black Lives to Matter” while, this podcast was prior to the deaths of Garner and Martin it helped to utilize other factors as contributors to the suspension of these individuals outside of race. As stated teachers with crowded classrooms may have less time to trouble shoot behaviors and really get to know the student which, can increase the child being disruptive. With the proven education gaps in addition to the school and prison pipeline I feel it's more than apparent that there should be other ways to handle issues in school than for suspension. Dr. Haight also discusses how schools are using prison terminology and that the zero tolerance policy while helpful can also promote kids being out of school. Policy and macro issues that arise in urban neighborhoods also contribute to the reactions of the children. I also, found that utilizing parents to help gauge how the suspension impacts the family as a whole was thought provoking. The suspension can cause disequilibrium in the entire household dynamic and cause funds to be lost dependent on childcare among other factors. With more thought on what are some contributing causes to the behavior administrators can find alternate ways to deal with the behaviors.

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Average Rating: 3stars  second 321 response: school suspensions, Friday, December 05, 2014

By Angela Codner :

Question:
Being that the study is about the higher rate of suspension of African American students, my question will be about race itself. It seems that the school system is structured to exclude and punish minorities. Do you think that the disciplinary system in the educational field was purposely made to reflect that of the criminal justice system? If so, who do you think is behind it? Superintendents? Governors? Congress? How far up the justice ladder do you think it goes?

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DISCLAIMER: The content shared by the presenter(s) and/or interviewer(s) of each podcast is their own and not necessarily representative of any views, research, or practice from the UB School of Social Work or the inSocialWork® podcast series.