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Episode 104 - Dr. Rachel Fusco: Developmental and Mental Health Screening in Child Welfare: Implications for Young Children in Rural Settings

Monday, October 01, 2012, 9:12:04 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Rachel Fusco describes her work with Universal Screening that involves an examination of the developmental and mental health needs of young children involved in the child welfare system. After sharing what she is learning from this research, she discusses the implications for child welfare-involved children and families in rural communities.

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Average Rating: 5stars  universal screening and the need for more services in rural communities, Friday, January 25, 2013

By Sarah :

Dr. Fusco mentions that children in rural communities tend to have more children that screen for developmental or mental health needs. What I enjoyed about this podcast is that Dr. Fusco created a clear path of what is happening with the universal screening in rural communities in Pennsylvania. She first explains what the intentions of universal screening is. Dr. Fusco then talks about the importance of engaging the parents and allowing them to see that child welfare is not as punitive as it may be perceived. She concludes with talking about the need for expansion of services in rural communities. In Pennsylvania's rural communities, even when the children are screened and either the children or their families need services whether developmental or mental health, they do not have access to the services they need in a timely manner. Dr. Fusco is clearly able to demonstrate what she states is the "disconnect between needs and actual services available."


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