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inSocialWork® is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice and practice to research. inSocialWork® features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.

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Episode 36 - Dr. Claude Welch: Spotlight on Human Rights: Economic Rights in the United States

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Episode 228 - Dr. Deb Ortega and Dr. Ashley Hanna: Why DACA? Why Now? (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Mary Keovisai, MSW

Monday, November 20, 2017, 7:23:48 AM

Image of Drs. Deb Ortega and Ashley Hanna

In the second of a two-part episode, our guests Dr. Deb Ortega and Dr. Ashley Hanna discuss the narratives commonly associated with DACA recipients and immigrants, arguing that these narratives need to be reconstructed. They share the more rarely discussed but accurate stories of these individuals, including the trauma and retraumatization they face. Our guests conclude part two by hypothesizing what DACA recipients can expect in the future and what social workers are called to do now.

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Episode 227 - Dr. Kristie Seelman: Sexual Minority Older Adults: Addressing Health Disparities and Promoting Healthy Aging

Interviewer: Louanne Bakk, PhD

Monday, November 06, 2017, 7:53:57 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Kristie Seelman discusses the unique challenges that lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adults face, as well as the need for services that are culturally competent and account for their unique realities. She describes her current research emphasizing coping strategies and differences in mental, cognitive, and physical health among sexual minority older persons.

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Episode 226 - Dr. Deb Ortega and Dr. Ashley Hanna: Why DACA? Why Now? (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Mary Keovisai, MSW

Monday, October 23, 2017, 7:30:00 AM

Image of Drs. Deb Ortega and Ashley Hanna

In the first of a two-part episode, our guests Dr. Deb Ortega and Dr. Ashley Hanna discuss all things DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). What is it, who are the people affected, and why does DACA find itself in the political crosshairs? Our guests conclude part one by describing why DACA is a concern for the social work profession and its practitioners.

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Episode 225 - Dr. Joy Learman: Gender-Based Violence and HIV Infection: Experiences of HIV-Positive African Immigrant Women

Interviewer: Eusebius Small, PhD

Monday, October 09, 2017, 7:43:57 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Joy Learman describes the underlying dynamics that can increase a woman's risk of being HIV-positive and failing to obtain treatment. She discusses her research involving contextual factors and personal experiences of HIV-positive African immigrant women. Dr. Learman emphasizes the need for support for at-risk groups and the development of policies that promote women's reproductive health and decrease their risk of HIV.

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Episode 215 - Dr. Henry Louis Taylor Jr.: The Economics of Urban Segregation (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Caitlin Beck

Monday, May 08, 2017, 7:57:42 AM

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In this episode, the second of a two-part discussion on the economics of urban segregation, Dr. Henry Louis Taylor introduces the concept of the "just city." He illustrates the contrasts between the just city and the underdeveloped urban communities that permeate the United States today. He also outlines the important role that social work must play in the development of just communities. Finally, using his research and experience in Cuba as a framework, Dr. Taylor describes how a society with very limited resources has been able to create highly developed communities to meet the needs of its inhabitants and, in doing so, place people over profits.

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Episode 214 - Nicole Clark: Social Work Entrepreneurship

Interviewer: Connor Walters

Monday, April 24, 2017, 7:42:04 AM

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In this episode, our guest Nicole Clark, LMSW, describes her journey from agency practitioner to self-employed, independent consultant. Ms. Clark discusses how she embraced the entrepreneurial spirit, moved forward, and eventually made a headlong leap into beginning her own business.

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Episode 213 - Dr. Henry Louis Taylor Jr.: The Economics of Urban Segregation (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Caitlin Beck

Monday, April 10, 2017, 7:40:37 AM

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With over 80 percent of Americans living in urban areas, it is crucial for social workers to consider how the development of cities in the United States has played a role in creating and maintaining the social and economic segregation that is so deeply woven into the fabric of most cities today. In the first of two episodes, Dr. Henry Louis Taylor argues that there is an intentionality to how cities are built that produces the "underdeveloped" neighborhoods that we see, where marginalized populations find themselves forced to live. Further, institutions put into place to solve the problems facing these communities are failing in their mission and have shifted to simply easing the suffering and misery of the communities' inhabitants.

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Episode 212 - Dr. Matthew Epperson and Dr. Carrie Pettus-Davis: Smart Decarceration

Interviewer: Patricia Logan-Greene, PhD

Monday, March 27, 2017, 7:34:11 AM

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In this episode, our guests Dr. Matthew Epperson and Dr. Carrie Pettus-Davis discuss their research and efforts to provide an alternative to the mass incarceration movement in the United States. Both are scholars and leaders of the Smart Decarceration Initiative, and they describe their mission and goals. They argue that our current system of mass incarceration should be replaced with effective and sustainable alternatives that protect society as well as assist people who have committed crimes.

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Episode 211 - Sarah Beck Buchanan, Wright Kaminer, and Dr. Roger Nooe: The Community Law Office: An Integration of Social Work and Criminal Defense

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, March 13, 2017, 7:32:43 AM

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In the United States, there are more than ten million criminal arrests each year. It is well known that many of those arrested also have a number of personal and environmental issues that not only shape their daily lives but can also be influential in their arrests and affect their defense and sentencing. In this episode, Sarah Beck Buchanan, Wright Kaminer, and Dr. Roger Nooe of the Knox County Public Defender's Office discuss their program, which has social workers working in collaboration with public defense attorneys with the goal of producing better legal outcomes by addressing the psychosocial needs of their clients.

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Episode 209 - Dr. Omid Safi: "Islamophobia" in America

Interviewer: Isok Kim, PhD

Monday, February 13, 2017, 7:40:38 AM

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Muslims have been part of the fabric of America for more than five hundred years. There were likely Muslim members of Columbus's crew when they arrived in the American hemisphere in 1492. Trans-Atlantic slavery would have certainly brought to this country Africans who practiced Islam. During the ratification of the United States Constitution, concern was voiced that one day there might be a Muslim president. Yet in the early 1800's, the Ramadan fast was once ended in the White House. In this podcast, our guest Dr. Omid Safi examines the complex history of Muslims in America. In doing so, his discussion helps us to more fully understand the impact of "Islamophoboia" in the United States.

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Episode 206 - Dr. David Gerber: The Continuing Relevance of Immigration History

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, January 02, 2017, 8:31:33 AM

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In this episode, Dr. David Gerber applies a lens of immigration history in the United States and helps us understand the reticence to reform our immigration policy and laws. He highlights how the popular narrative we have about immigrants and refugees stands in sharp contrast to what is really happening in our society.

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Episode 203 - Dr. Linda Plitt Donaldson, Dr. Kristie Holmes, and Dr. Charles E. Lewis, Jr.: Wanted: Social Workers on Capitol Hill

Monday, November 07, 2016, 7:43:19 AM

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For a variety of reasons, social workers in the United States, unfortunately, often avoid becoming actively engaged in the political process. In this podcast, Drs. Linda Plitt Donaldson, Kristie Holmes, and Charles E. Lewis, Jr. discuss the importance of social workers pushing past their reticence and becoming more involved in the political process. The panel shares their thoughts and suggests a range of approaches from advocacy to running for political office.

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Episode 202 - Dr. Wonhyung Lee, Meera Bhat, and Nurul Widyaningrum: Microfinance in India, Indonesia, and the United States: Implications for Social Work

Interviewer: Shaanta Murshid, PhD

Monday, October 24, 2016, 7:37:00 AM

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Scholarly literature and practice experience have shown that low-income people around the world can use credit responsibly, make timely payments, and save to make their lives more manageable. In this episode, Dr. Wonhyung Lee, Meera Bhat, and Nurul Widyaningrum discuss the range of financial services called microfinance, which provides low-income persons access to affordable and quality financial services to promote empowerment and the building of assets.

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Episode 200 - Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault: Enhancing Relationships Forums: People and Law Enforcement Agencies Moving Change Forward

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, September 26, 2016, 7:40:54 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault discuss their response to the widening divide between the African-American community and law enforcement officials. Following the killings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice, as well as NYPD officers Rafeal Ramos and Wenjian Liu, our guests developed a working group and an action plan. Enhancing Relationships Forums is the tangible result, and it brings together representatives of law enforcement personnel, the Social Work profession, members of the African-American community, and the community at large for empathic dialog. Here, they describe the process, lessons learned, and recommendations for community action in communities everywhere.

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Episode 197 - Dr. Larry Davis: "Why Are They Angry with Us?": A Discussion on Race and Racism in America

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD

Monday, August 15, 2016, 7:41:35 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Larry Davis engages in a wide-ranging discussion on race and racism in America. The topics he addresses include his use of cognitive dissonance theory to understand racism and racist behavior. He explores how implicit racism affects all members of American society and defines a concept he refers to as "relative deprivation." Dr. Davis also explains why multiculturalism is insufficient as the principal method of addressing racism.

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Episode 196 - Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee: Lessons from the Immigrant Experience: Where the Erosion of Social Justice Begins (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, August 01, 2016, 7:40:48 AM

Image of Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee

In the second of a two-part podcast, Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee continue their conversation chronicling the experiences of immigrants and examining the history of U.S. policy addressing the needs of these people. In this episode, they explore common myths that characterize our popular and policy discussions about immigrants and describe how these policies affect lives in our communities. Our guests conclude with recommendations for skills needed by social workers who provide services to these clients.

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Episode 195 - Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee: Lessons from the Immigrant Experience: Where the Erosion of Social Justice Begins (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, July 04, 2016, 9:13:52 AM

Image of Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee

In this first of two episodes, Dr. Deb Ortega, Dr. Ashley Hanna, and Dr. Badiah Haffejee discuss their work chronicling the experiences of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers while examining the history of U.S. policies addressing the needs of these people. Utilizing human rights and social justice as context, they observe that the development and changes in U.S. policy have historically addressed mostly the needs of the dominant culture. Our guests describe the reality for immigrants, the persons most affected by our debate and policies.

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Episode 194 - Dr. David Brennan: Online Sexual Health Outreach for Gay and Bisexual Men: Providers' Perspectives

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, June 20, 2016, 7:40:40 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. David Brennan talks about his work in the development and evaluation of online outreach to address issues of gay and bisexual men’s health. To highlight this work, Dr. Brennan describes CRUISElab, a research lab focused on gay and bisexual men's health. He also talks about the "Cruising Counts" study, which has been essential in developing new guidelines for online health outreach to gay men in Ontario.

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Episode 192 - Dr. Caroline Long Burry: "No One Asked About My Children": Voices of Incarcerated Mothers

Interviewer: Patricia Logan-Greene, PhD

Monday, May 23, 2016, 9:42:09 AM

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A report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics showed that from 1991 to 2007 the number of incarcerated mothers increased by a startling one hundred and thirty-one percent. In this podcast, Dr. Caroline Long Burry discusses a pilot study she conducted with these parents with the hope of better understanding their parenting experiences. Also explored are the mothers' attempts to negotiate the criminal justice system while in their role as parents.

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Episode 191 - Dr. Adrienne Dessel, Dr. Michael Woodford, and Kevin Goodman: LGBT Discrimination on Campus and Heterosexual Bystanders: Understanding the Intention to Intervene

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD

Monday, May 09, 2016, 7:47:06 AM

Image of Dr. Adrienne Dessel, Dr. Michael Woodford, and Kevin Goodman

In this episode, our guests discuss their research related to LGBT discrimination on college campuses and the context in which heterosexual bystanders are most likely to intervene. They highlight the specific skills and attitudes that can be fostered to promote supportive heterosexual bystander involvement and inclusive environments for LGBT individuals.

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Episode 189 - Rachel Forbes, Dr. Andrea Nesmith, Meredith Powers, and Dr. Cathryne Schmitz: Environmental Justice

Interviewer: Louanne Bakk, PhD

Monday, April 11, 2016, 8:00:37 AM

Image of Rachel Forbes, Dr. Andrea Nesmith, Meredith Powers, and Dr. Cathryne Schmitz

In this episode, our guests discuss their contention that environmental social work and environmental justice represent a subset of our traditional conceptualization of social justice. Whether it is the water in Flint, Michigan or the effects of global warming, the disproportionate impact on vulnerable and marginalized communities requires that social workers practice beyond the micro level and enter into the arenas of advocacy, influencing policy-making, social action, and various other social work role sets.

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Episode 186 - Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone: The Anti-Racism Project: A Strategy for Preparing Social Work Educators

Interviewer: Berg Miller, MSW

Monday, February 29, 2016, 8:52:37 AM

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The NASW Code of Ethics and International Federation of Social Workers’ "Statement of Ethical Principles" call for social workers to challenge discrimination, oppression, and "unjust policies and practices." In the United States, racism remains a lasting and pernicious example of those injustices. In this podcast, Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone describe the development of their Anti-Racism Project. The discussion includes their experience as the Project's facilitators and group members, research connected to the Project, and their advocacy for the need to include equity work in social work doctoral education. They also identify four important themes that seemed to emanate from their work.

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Episode 185 - Dr. Pablo Arriaza: Spanish Language Self-Efficacy Beliefs Among Spanish-Speaking Social Workers

Interviewer: Julie Hasselbeck

Monday, February 15, 2016, 8:25:47 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Pablo Arriaza argues that simply speaking and understanding another language does not equate to language competency. He describes what he learned about Spanish-speaking social workers' beliefs about their own self-efficacy with the Spanish language and their need for support, validation, and quality supervision. Dr. Arriaza explains why bilingual social workers are crucial in assisting the profession to act on its core values.

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Episode 181 - Chad Allee: Leadership in Social Work

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz, LCSW

Monday, December 07, 2015, 7:40:36 AM

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The idea of leadership is finding its way more often into the discussions of professional social work, but what is meant by "leadership"? And, what does being a "leader" mean? In this episode, Chad Allee describes what leadership is, argues for the importance of leadership in social work, and points to the need to cultivate more social work leaders.

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Episode 179 - Dr. Virginia Eubanks: Casework, Social Justice, and the Information Age (part 2 of 2)

Monday, November 09, 2015, 7:49:06 AM

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This episode is the second of two parts that explore social justice in the information age. In it, Dr. Virginia Eubanks continues her discussion on this topic with a question and answer exchange with members of University at Buffalo School of Social Work community.

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Episode 178 - Dr. Devonya Havis: "Stand Your Ground" Legislation and Implications for State-Sponsored Racism

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, October 26, 2015, 7:50:57 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Devonya Havis describes how "Stand Your Ground" legislation, intended to safeguard our society's most vulnerable members, has been utilized in ways that perpetuate and even exacerbate existing disparities experienced by persons of color. She discusses implicit bias, the bidirectional relationship between blackness and crime, "reasonable belief", and how these forces combine to shape individual behavior as well as societal institutions and systems.

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Episode 177 - Dr. Virginia Eubanks: Casework, Social Justice, and the Information Age (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD

Monday, October 12, 2015, 7:56:03 AM

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This episode is the first of two with Dr. Virginia Eubanks. In it she discusses her work in understanding technology in the lives of low-income communities as well as how technology is used to manage the poor. She highlights an attempt to use technology to change the eligibility and case management processes for financial assistance as an example of why this topic is an important social justice issue.

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Episode 176 - Adalberto Méndez López and Dr. Filomena Critelli: Globally Connected Classrooms: Partnership, Technology, and Human Rights

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, September 28, 2015, 7:39:58 AM

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In this episode, our guests Adalberto Méndez López and Dr. Filomena Critelli discuss their experience of bringing their students together via technology to co-instruct a new course titled "Disability and Human Rights from the Perspective of Law and Social Work". Along the way, they tell what they learned while bridging the gap between disciplines, cultures, degrees of technological know-how, and geographical locations.

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Episode 175 - A Panel Discussion on Systemic Racism (part 2 of 2)

Monday, September 14, 2015, 7:32:04 AM

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In this episode, the second of two parts, Professors Elizabeth Bowen, Diane Elze, Isok Kim, and Charles Syms of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work continue their conversation about how they have approached the topic of systemic racism with their social work students. Here the panel's discussion shifts to why they believe it is important for social work education to specifically address the issue of racism. They also explore this topic from the School of Social Work's trauma-informed, human rights perspective.

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Episode 173 - A Panel Discussion on Systemic Racism (part 1 of 2)

Monday, August 17, 2015, 9:38:01 AM

Image of Elizabeth Bowen, Diane Elze, Isok Kim, and Charles Syms

The social work code of ethics asks that social workers focus efforts at addressing discrimination and other forms of social injustice. Therefore, it is essential that social workers in training be provided the opportunity to learn about and explore the inequities faced by individuals, groups, and communities they will work with. In this episode, the first of two parts, four members of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work faculty (Elizabeth Bowen, Diane Elze, Isok Kim, and Charles Syms) share their experience and thoughts about leading classroom discussions on this important and often challenging topic.

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Episode 172 - Dr. William Wipfler: Human Rights and Torture (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Stephanie Sacco

Monday, August 03, 2015, 8:34:18 AM

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In this episode, Dr. William Wipfler continues his discussion of human rights by exploring the assumptions and root causes that drive immigration to the United States. He describes who is coming and why, and the unintended consequences of U.S. policy for this complex challenge.

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Episode 171 - Dr. William Wipfler: Human Rights and Torture (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Stephanie Sacco

Monday, July 06, 2015, 8:51:02 AM

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In 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration's thirty articles outline twenty-four basic rights afforded to all people simply because they are human beings. In this episode, Dr. William Wipfler, having spent more than 60 years advocating for human rights, discusses his human rights work, the issue of torture, and his belief that human rights abuses must always be confronted.

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Episode 169 - Kathrine Bisanz: Social Workers for Reproductive Justice

Interviewer: Gretchen Ely, PhD

Monday, June 08, 2015, 7:23:43 AM

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Reproductive justice is a framework grounded in international human rights that seeks to increase social, political, and economic power and resources so that people can make healthy decisions about gender, sexuality, and families for themselves and their communities. In this episode, Katherine Bisanz, co-founder of Social Workers for Reproductive Justice, describes the organization's mission and the role of social work in this movement.

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Episode 165 - Dr. James Mulvale: Basic Income: An Anti-Poverty Strategy for Social Work

Interviewer: Gretchen Ely, PhD

Monday, April 13, 2015, 9:34:35 AM

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In this episode, Dr. James Mulvale explains the idea of a basic income. He offers reasons for instituting a basic income and reviews some of the typical objections. Dr. Mulvale also provides a rationale for why this is an anti-poverty model that social work should embrace.

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Episode 164 - Dr. Richard Smith: A Social Worker's Report from the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development

Interviewer: Shaanta Murshid, PhD

Monday, March 30, 2015, 9:08:45 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Richard Smith describes his attendance and experiences at the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Highlighting Social Work's long history of working to improve environmental conditions, end poverty, and foster social development, Dr. Smith discusses the conference's takeaways and the implications for social work practice.

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Episode 155 - Dr. Wendy Haight: Caregivers' Moral Narratives of Their African American Children's Out-of-School Suspensions: Implications for Effective Family-School Collaborations

Interviewer: Annette Semanchin-Jones, PhD

Monday, November 10, 2014, 9:39:43 AM

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A report from 2006 indicates that almost three and half million children were suspended or expelled from American schools. Of additional concern is that black students are suspended or expelled at a rate three times that of their white peers. In this podcast, Dr. Wendy Haight explores this problem through the experiences and perceptions of those students' caretakers. Dr. Haight's work provides a different view and offers another opportunity for social work to address this complex problem.

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Episode 153 - Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Laurie Cook Heffron: Modern Slavery: Social Work's Role in Addressing Human Trafficking

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, October 13, 2014, 8:04:28 AM

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The United Nations Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking estimates that there as many as 2.5 million people in forced labor at any given time. The U.S. State Department estimates that between 600,000 and 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year. There may be as many as 27 million slaves in the world today. In this episode, Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Ms. Laurie Cook Heffron examine these disturbing issues and describe social work's role in addressing them.

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Episode 152 - Dr. Mimi Abramovitz: Changes in U.S. Social Welfare Policy: The Effects of Privatization on Human Services (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, September 29, 2014, 8:47:48 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Mimi Abramovitz continues her discussion of the rise of New Public Management (NPM) and the privatization of human services. She concludes by discussing her research on the impact of NPM on persons in the front lines of human service agencies and the services they provide.

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Episode 151 - Arati Maleku: Human Migration in the 21st Century: Implications for the Social Work Profession

Interviewer: Isok Kim, PhD

Monday, September 15, 2014, 7:26:17 AM

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Human migration is a natural phenomenon as old as humanity. Some people leave their places of origin to escape natural or human-caused calamities. Others leave to find better economic circumstances. And, for some, it may be the adventure of new and exciting experiences. In this episode, Arati Maleku discusses current trends in human migration, explains some of migration's challenges and opportunities, and offers suggestions on social work practice with migrant populations.

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Episode 150 - Dr. Mimi Abramovitz: Changes in U.S. Social Welfare Policy: The Effects of Privatization on Human Services (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, September 01, 2014, 5:45:56 PM

Image of Dr. Mimi Abramovitz

In this episode, Dr. Mimi Abramovitz discusses the privatization of human services and the rise of New Public Management. She reviews evolving economic conditions, historical changes in U.S. social welfare policy, and the subsequent impact on human service agencies, their workforce and, ultimately, the clients they serve.

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Episode 147 - Dr. Rukshan Fernando and Andy Germak: Social Entrepreneurship as a Social Work Practice

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, July 07, 2014, 9:57:36 AM

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When asked about the word "entrepreneurship," most people are likely to think about business-oriented activities, perhaps, more specifically, using business innovation as a route to develop or enhance a business enterprise. However, most people probably have not considered using social consciousness as a foundation for engaging in entrepreneurial activities. In this podcast, Professors Rukshan Fernando and Andy Germak will explore using entrepreneurship as a method to address social change.

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Episode 145 - Jorien Brock and Siobhan Fitzgerald-Cushing: Meeting the Health Needs of Transgender People

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, June 09, 2014, 9:31:38 AM

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According to the National Center for Transgender Equality, people who identify as transgender are estimated to comprise between one quarter and one percent of the U.S. population. Often targeted for overt discrimination, a transgender person may, rightly, feel the need to protect themselves from the intolerant or rejecting responses they are subjected to. However, the need to be open and engaged is critical to ensure appropriate health care. In this episode, members of the Pride Center of Western New York discuss how the Center's Transgender Health Initiative meets the health care needs of transgender people.

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Episode 142 - Chandran Chetan: Action and Empowerment in India: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, April 28, 2014, 8:41:06 AM

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In this episode, Chandran Chetan continues our previous discussion of India's "invisible maids" and the human trafficking that is fostered by the demand for these workers. Here, our guest describes how the National Domestic Workers Movement builds institutional support for the workers and how they promote social action and change through the direct participation of the women in speaking out on their own behalf. Fr. Chetan highlights the movement's work in organization and unionization activities and outlines the current activity and challenges on behalf of this exploited population.

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Episode 140 - Christin Mary: India's Invisible Maids: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, March 31, 2014, 8:08:27 AM

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In this episode, Christin Mary of the National Domestic Workers Movement describes her work advocating, organizing, and participating in social action to empower exploited domestic workers in India. Young women, typically from impoverished rural areas, are trafficked into cities, where their human rights are violated. Our guest describes her organization's efforts in organizing and empowering these women, as well as the legislative successes they have realized.

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Episode 136 - Dr. Brian Kelly: Superman in the Smallest Place: Exploring a Music Studio for Young People Experiencing Homelessness

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz

Monday, February 03, 2014, 8:27:48 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Brian Kelly describes his experience and research with homeless youth. Specifically, he looks into the effectiveness of utilizing a music studio in a transitional living program to engage young people's strengths and promote their resilience.

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Episode 134 - Dr. Kelli Canada: The Role of Caseworker-Client Relationships Within Mental Health Courts

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, January 06, 2014, 8:07:51 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Kelli Canada discusses her research on the perceived relationship between mental health court participants and their caseworkers, and its effect on outcomes.

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Episode 131 - Dr. Toni Miles: Health Care Policy: Medicaid Expansion and the Affordable Care Act

Interviewer: Nancy Kusmaul, LMSW, PhD

Monday, November 11, 2013, 8:20:55 AM

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Created in 1965, Medicaid, a form of health insurance, was developed to address the health care needs of low-income families as well as individuals who had a disability, were blind, or were aged. Recently, Medicaid is undergoing change. With the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid offers the opportunity for expanding eligibility. In this episode, Dr. Toni P. Miles discusses health care policy, Medicaid expansion, and the Affordable Care Act.

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Episode 130 - Michael Boucai: The Impact and Ramifications of the Recent Supreme Court Rulings Regarding Same-Sex Marriage

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD

Monday, October 28, 2013, 10:17:22 AM

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In this episode, Law Professor Michael Boucai discusses the recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8. He describes the specifics of those rulings and the practical effects the rulings produce at the level of people's everyday lives and social practices.

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Episode 129 - Agnes Williams: Native Americans and a Human Rights and Trauma-Informed Perspective

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, MSW, PhD

Monday, October 14, 2013, 9:56:42 AM

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In this episode, Ms. Agnes Williams, a member of the Seneca Nation, uses her Nation's experience as a context to discuss cultural appreciation. She also explores the concept of historical trauma as well as the ideals of human rights and social justice, and how those ideals have been compromised. Additionally, she reflects on her work with social work student interns and the need to take affirmative steps to provide support for Native American social work students.

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Episode 128 - Dr. Md. Tuhinul Islam: Residential Childcare: The Experiences of Children in Bangladesh

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, MSW, PhD

Monday, September 30, 2013, 9:30:01 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Md. Tuhinul Islam takes us on a journey to Bangladesh, where he studies the experiences of children in residential childcare settings. He describes how and why children find their way to these settings and what he is learning about outcomes, including those who leave those institutions.

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Episode 126 - Dr. Jodi Jacobson Frey and Robin McKinney: Financial Social Work: Advancing the Economic Stability and Capability of Individuals, Families, and Communities

Interviewer: Peter Sobota, LCSW

Monday, September 02, 2013, 10:02:28 AM

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In this episode, our guests Dr. Jodi Jacobson Frey and Robin McKinney discuss their work with the Financial Social Work Initiative at the University of Maryland School of Social Work and the Maryland CASH Campaign. They discuss how social workers can work to improve and sustain clients’ financial capability, while collaborating with community members and professionals from a variety of disciplines, to improve economic conditions for individuals and communities through direct practice, advocacy, policy development, and research.

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Episode 125 - Dr. Michael Reisch: The State of Social Work Education (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary N. Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, August 19, 2013, 9:03:02 AM

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In this episode, the first of two parts, Dr. Michael Reisch describes the role that social work education has in facilitating the emerging professional’s understanding of the institutional and structural inequalities facing oppressed and disenfranchised people. He also discusses the necessity for social work to reconnect with its historical mission of directly addressing social injustice.

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Episode 121 - Dr. Christina Sogar: Beyond Diagnosis: The Dynamics of Disability and Disruptions in Parenting

Interviewer: Kathleen A. Knaak, LMSW

Monday, June 10, 2013, 9:18:57 AM

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It has been suggested that there are between 4.1 and 9 million parents who have a disability. In this episode, Dr. Christina Sogar discusses how characteristics of disability (e.g., onset and symptom variability) impact and shape the parenting process and can increase the likelihood of child welfare involvement.

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Episode 112 - Dr. Sandra Butler: Should I Stay or Should I Go?: Home Care Workers and Factors Affecting Turnover and Retention

Interviewer: Diane Elze, Ph.D.

Monday, February 04, 2013, 9:09:15 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Sandra Butler discusses her work and findings with the Maine Home Healthcare Retention Study. Putting a human face on "the centerpiece of our long-term care system," Dr. Butler describes the predictors of turnover and retention and how the workers themselves describe their jobs. She tells us what she has learned about why these workers stay and why significant numbers of them leave their positions.

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Episode 109 - Dr. Luke Shaefer: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (Food Stamps) and the Material Well-Being of Low-Income Families with Children

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, December 10, 2012, 9:02:00 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Luke Shaefer discusses the effects of the U.S.'s largest means-tested income support program, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program. Recent breakthroughs in research methods have allowed us to better measure these effects, and results suggest that SNAP improves food security among participant households as well as non-food material well-being.

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Episode 106 - Dr. Yunju Nam: Asset-Based Policy: A New Direction in Social Welfare Policy

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, October 29, 2012, 9:30:50 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Yunju Nam describes her research in Asset-Based Policy, an alternative to our current income maintenance policies that attempt to respond to the needs of social welfare recipients. She describes how this new paradigm addresses the long term needs of persons living in or near poverty. In addition, Dr. Nam discusses the psychological benefit that asset ownership has on a person's hope, motivation, and quality of life.

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Episode 94 - Dr. Shelly Wiechelt and Dr. Corey Shdaimah: Women's Experiences in Street-Level Prostitution: Implications for Court-Based and Social Service Programs (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Margaret Coombes, PhD

Monday, April 16, 2012, 8:25:05 AM

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In the second of a two-part podcast, Dr. Shelly Wiechelt and Dr. Corey Shdaimah return to conclude the discussion of their research into women engaging in street-level prostitution in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Episode 92 - Dr. Shelly Wiechelt and Dr. Corey Shdaimah: Women's Experiences in Street-Level Prostitution: Implications for Court-Based and Social Service Programs (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Margaret Coombes, PhD

Monday, March 19, 2012, 9:57:35 AM

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In part one of a two-part podcast, Drs. Wiechelt and Shdaimah discuss their research of women in prostitution in Baltimore, Maryland. They describe how they were drawn to study the women, explain the importance of debunking popular myths related to this population, and emphasize why trauma-informed services rather than punitive and shaming responses are warranted.

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Episode 89 - Dr. Eugene Walls: School Engagement Among Sexual Minority Students: Allies, Alliances, and Academic Outcomes

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD, MSSA

Monday, February 06, 2012, 8:29:45 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. Eugene Walls discusses his research on school engagement among sexual minority students. His research is aimed at understanding the contributing roles of school climate, adult allies, and gay-straight alliances in predicting academic outcomes.

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Episode 88 - Dr. Manisha Joshi: Attitudes Toward Intimate Partner Violence Among Women in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD, MSW

Monday, January 23, 2012, 8:03:52 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Manisha Joshi utilizes a unique lens to look at a familiar topic. She describes her research regarding the role of changing attitudes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) in three Central Asian countries. Dr. Joshi discusses what she has learned about the context in which IPV occurs in these countries and its impact on help-seeking and reporting behavior of the women who live there.

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Episode 87 - Dr. Pam Miller: Oregon's Death with Dignity Act: Hospice Social Work and End-of-Life Decision-Making

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, January 09, 2012, 9:12:51 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Pam Miller discusses her research on social worker attitudes, values, and practices since the enactment of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act.

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Episode 81 - Jessica Greenawalt: Using Social Capital to Achieve Goals in a Low-Income, Immigrant Community

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, October 03, 2011, 8:41:53 AM

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Jessica Greenawalt discusses her work with the Chelsea Collaborative Social Capital Campaign to improve community-level outcomes. The Collaborative used participatory action research methods to assess the community's needs and develop initiatives to meet those needs through civic engagement.

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Episode 76 - Dr. Patricia Shannon: Peeling the Fear from the Past: Building Community Capacities for Healing Refugee Trauma as a Human Rights Strategy

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD, MSW

Monday, July 25, 2011, 9:01:45 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Patricia Shannon discusses her research related to the impact of war trauma and torture on the mental health of resettling refugee communities. Our guest describes research on the state of mental health screening practices based on a recent national survey and findings from her recent focus groups on the mental health of Karen, Bhutanese, Oromo and Somali refugees. Dr. Shannon describes efforts to develop community capacity for meeting the mental health needs of refugees and how community based healing can be utilized as a strategy to address the larger context of international human rights.

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Episode 75 - Dr. Elizabeth Lightfoot: Parents with Disabilities and the Child Welfare System

Interviewer: Savra Frounfelker, MSW

Monday, July 11, 2011, 9:01:30 AM

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Child welfare has a strong crossover with the disability field, yet there has been little critical examination of child welfare services through a disability lens and no substantial examination of how its policies and programs affect people with disabilities and their family members. In this episode, Dr. Elizabeth Lightfoot discusses her research on the impact of child welfare policies on parents with disabilities.

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Episode 73 - Dr. Rebecca Thomas and Dr. Jill Witmer Sinha: Microcredit, Women Entrepreneurs, and Nonprofits in Kolkata: Social Work's Local and International Role

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, June 13, 2011, 8:32:24 AM

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Microfinance is recognized as an anti-poverty tool and a conduit for financial assistance and capacity building. In their research, Drs. Rebecca Thomas and Jill Witmer Sinha examine differences between the benefits provided by nonprofit and for-profit microfinance institutions specifically as they pertain to women. Drs. Thomas and Sinha present findings from a case study of one program in Kolkata, India highlighting the array of complementary services offered to microloan clients and their potential for bridging the gap between the "haves and have-nots."

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Episode 72 - Dr. Jan Ivery and Dr. M. Lori Thomas: Aging in Place on the Streets: Homelessness Among Older Adults

Interviewer: Nancy Kusmaul, LMSW

Tuesday, May 31, 2011, 8:14:14 AM

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Drs. Jan Ivery and M. Lori Thomas discuss the findings of their research with the often overlooked older adult homeless population. Our guests describe the challenges of meeting the unique needs of this population and the contradictions that are raised as the older adult homeless population burgeons.

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Episode 70 - Dr. David Patterson, Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya): Promoting Wellness and Challenging Cultural Narratives in Native American Communities

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 02, 2011, 8:19:00 AM

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In this episode, Dr. David Patterson describes the Three Sisters and other core ideas that informed the creation and evolution of the Native American Center for Wellness Research. This discussion explores how the Center builds programs that enhance the educational experiences of Native American students, researches and promotes Native American wellness, and collaborates in peace and social justice ceremonies in the community.

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Episode 69 - Dr. Patricia Carlson and Dr. Nancy Humphreys: The Walmartization of Social Services: Impacts and Ethical Considerations of When Clients Become Workers

Interviewer: Charles Syms, MSW

Monday, April 18, 2011, 9:00:33 AM

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Drs. Patricia Carlson and Nancy Humphreys discuss findings of state and national studies examining the phenomenon of women who leave the welfare rolls and become employees of social service agencies. This conversation addresses prevalence, impact, and ethical implications.

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Episode 68 - Dr. Michael Reisch: How Did Social Work Get Here?: The Historical Narratives That Shape Social Work Research and Practice (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, DSW, MS

Monday, April 04, 2011, 9:21:13 AM

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This is the second of two episodes in which Dr. Michael Reisch describes how the past is the present, and how "master narratives" about historical events have come to frame how the social work research agenda has been set, how its been done, and how its findings have been implemented. Dr. Reisch continues his historical overview from the 1930's to present day, touching on the eras of McCarthyism, Marxsim, Scientific Positivism, and Post-Modernism. He concludes with provocative observations and challenges for current research and practice.

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Episode 67 - Dr. Poco Kernsmith and Dr. Roger Kernsmith: I <3 U Send Pix: Addressing Youth Sexting

Interviewer: Nicole M. Fava, MSW, PhD Candidate

Monday, March 21, 2011, 10:19:49 AM

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Behaviors like sexting are not new phenomena. However, technology increases the ease and risks of such behaviors. This podcast explores the prevalence of sexting and discuss an appropriate and balanced approach to practice and policy intervention.

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Episode 66 - Dr. Michael Reisch: How Did Social Work Get Here?: The Historical Narratives That Shape Social Work Research and Practice (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, DSW, MS

Monday, March 07, 2011, 8:37:49 AM

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This is first of two episodes in which Dr. Michael Reisch describes how "the past is the present" and how "master narratives" about historical events have come to frame how the social work research agenda has been set, how it's been done, and how its findings have been implemented. Dr. Reisch begins with the Progressive Era and concludes part one with the New Deal period.

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Episode 64 - Dr. Anna Santiago, Dr. George Galster, and Renee Nicolosi: Where People Live Matters: Using Housing Policy as an Anti-Poverty and Asset-Building Intervention

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD, MS

Monday, February 07, 2011, 9:56:54 AM

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In this episode, our guests discuss their research that attempts to respond to and understand how housing policy influences not only its clients, but the neighborhoods in which they reside. They describe, amongst other programs, the Home Ownership Program in Denver, Colorado; their longitudinal research; their findings; and the continuing challenges to sustaining home ownership and its effect on poverty.

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Episode 57 - Dr. Robert Milch and Dr. Donald Shedd: Good Outcomes at the End of Life: The History of Hospice Buffalo

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, October 18, 2010, 10:56:06 AM

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Drs. Robert Milch and Donald Shedd have been leaders in the hospice movement since its early days. In this episode, they discuss the history of hospice and hospice in Buffalo, NY, the challenges of the early days of hospice, changes in hospice care over the years, and what they see as the future of hospice and palliative care.

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Episode 56 - Dr. Julie Spielberger: "Sometimes Things Don't Work Out": Barriers and Facilitators of Service Use

Interviewer: Laura A. Lewis, PhD, LCSW, ACSW

Monday, October 04, 2010, 8:10:50 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Julie Spielberger discusses findings from her study of a system of prevention and early intervention services for families of young children in low-income communities in Florida’s Palm Beach County. She describes her data examining the use of a broad array of health, educational, and social services by families in targeted low-income communities, patterns of service use over time, barriers and facilitators of service use, and how service use is related to family functioning, child development, and school readiness.

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Episode 54 - Joyce James, LMSW-AP and Carolyne Rodriguez, MSW: Addressing Disproportionality: Promising Practice Innovations

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, September 06, 2010, 10:39:06 AM

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In this episode, Joyce James of the Texas Department of Family Protective Services and Carolyne Rodriguez of Casey Family Programs' Texas State Strategy systems improvement initiative discuss how their collaboration is addressing disproportionality statewide through promising practices and innovations in undoing racism trainings, values-based leadership development, and community engagement strategies.

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Episode 49 - Susan Mangold: Child Welfare Services: Does the Source of Funding Matter?

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, June 28, 2010, 9:54:53 AM

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In this episode, Professor of Law Susan Mangold discusses how child welfare services are funded, and reviews her findings as she "follows the money." She goes on to describe how the type or source of funding impacts outcomes and quality of child welfare services to a larger degree than the amount of that funding.

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Episode 41 - Dr. Elisabeth Reichert: Social Work and Human Rights

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD, MSSA

Monday, March 08, 2010, 10:46:40 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Elisabeth Reichert traces the history of the human rights movement and addresses the role of social work in that movement. She discusses the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, political, civil, social, and economic rights, and women's rights, and compares the concepts of universal verses culturally relative human rights. She concludes with a discussion of the role of international education and improved understanding of human rights.

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Episode 34 - Dr. Sarah Craun: Evaluating the Efficacy of Sexual Offender Registries

Interviewer: Susan Green, LCSW

Monday, November 30, 2009, 9:41:35 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Sarah Craun discusses Megan's law and what she is learning about sexual offender registries' usefulness in raising awareness and protecting the public.

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Episode 23 - Bruce Nisbet, LMSW: Empowerment and Recovery: The Impact of George W. Bush's "President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health"

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, June 29, 2009, 2:16:08 PM

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In this episode, Bruce Nisbet talks about how the "President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health" transformed service delivery for individuals with severe mental illness in New York and across the United States.

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Episode 19 - Dr. Michael Hogan: The "President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health": Promise, Progress, and Challenge

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 04, 2009, 10:51:22 AM

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Dr. Hogan discusses his work on the Bush Administration's President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, which he chaired from 2002-2003. He discusses how the work of the Commission focused research and service efforts in mental health on promoting recovery, resilience, and transformation in the lives of individuals with mental illness, and what he sees as the ongoing challenges of the work.

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Episode 17 - Dr. Sandra Lane: Structural Violence and Disparities in Health

Interviewer: Bernadette Hoppe, JD, MPH, MA

Monday, April 06, 2009, 10:45:20 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. Sandra Lane discusses how policy and environment promote disparities in health among people of color.

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Episode 13 - Dr. Erik Nisbet: International Conflict and Social Identity: The Influence of Mass Media on "Us vs. Them" Thinking

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, February 09, 2009, 12:29:09 PM

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Dr. Erik Nisbet discusses how perceptions of international conflict and terrorism across national contexts are shaped by the interplay of mass media frames and social identity schema. Dr. Nisbet describes the parallel processes that occur in the United States and the Muslim world.

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Episode 6 - Dr. Karen Sowers: Social Work at its Roots: Using Microenterprise to Promote Health, Social Welfare, and Community Building Among Street Children in Indonesia

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 03, 2008, 10:44:03 AM

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Dr. Catherine Dulmus, Director of the Buffalo Center for Social Research, speaks with Dr. Karen Sowers, Dean of the College of Social Work at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, about a project aimed at developing microenterprise among street children in Indonesia.

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Episode 1 - Hon. Lisa Bloch Rodwin: Social Workers in the Justice System

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Wednesday, August 20, 2008, 8:53:28 PM

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This episode features a conversation with domestic violence expert, the Hon. Lisa Bloch Rodwin, Family Court judge for Erie County, New York, discussing the important role of social workers in the justice system.

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DISCLAIMER: The content shared by the presenter(s) and/or interviewer(s) of each podcast is their own and not necessarily representative of any views, research, or practice from the UB School of Social Work or the inSocialWork® podcast series.

Get all episodes at the series' home page.

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