Social Work History & Theory Episodes

inSocialWork® is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice and practice to research. inSocialWork® features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.

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The following episodes are in the *Social Work History & Theory* category:

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Episode 154 - Dr. Toba Kerson and Dr. Judith McCoyd: In Response to Need: An Analysis of Social Work Roles Over Time

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, October 27, 2014, 11:08:03 AM

Image of Dr. Toba Kerson and Dr. Judith McCoyd

In this episode, based on a research article published in the journal Social Work in 2013, Drs. Toba Kerson and Judith McCoyd discuss their latest work re-examining interviews conducted in 1976 with the pioneers of health-related social work. They compare those with themes they identified with current workers in the healthcare field and describe how the distinctive way that social workers respond to needs remains consistent with our core values and skill set.

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Episode 68 - Dr. Michael Reisch: How Did Social Work Get Here?: The Historical Narratives That Shape Social Work Research and Practice (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, DSW, MS

Monday, April 04, 2011, 9:21:13 AM

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This is the second of two episodes in which Dr. Michael Reisch describes how the past is the present, and how "master narratives" about historical events have come to frame how the social work research agenda has been set, how its been done, and how its findings have been implemented. Dr. Reisch continues his historical overview from the 1930's to present day, touching on the eras of McCarthyism, Marxsim, Scientific Positivism, and Post-Modernism. He concludes with provocative observations and challenges for current research and practice.

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Episode 66 - Dr. Michael Reisch: How Did Social Work Get Here?: The Historical Narratives That Shape Social Work Research and Practice (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, DSW, MS

Monday, March 07, 2011, 8:37:49 AM

Image of Dr. Michael Reisch

This is first of two episodes in which Dr. Michael Reisch describes how "the past is the present" and how "master narratives" about historical events have come to frame how the social work research agenda has been set, how it's been done, and how its findings have been implemented. Dr. Reisch begins with the Progressive Era and concludes part one with the New Deal period.

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Episode 65 - Marion Bogo: Doing, Thinking, Then Doing Again: Reflective Practice in Field Education

Interviewer: Zoe Koston, LCSW-R, ACSW

Monday, February 21, 2011, 7:14:30 AM

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Field education is a signature pedagogy of the social work profession. Professor Marion Bogo discusses what informs this approach to educating social work professionals; the factors that lead to high-quality, effective field instruction; and ongoing challenges to providing it.

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Episode 60 - Alankaar Sharma: Tuskegee and the Negro Project: The Intersections of Race, Gender, and Public Health (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 29, 2010, 8:33:52 AM

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This is the second of two episodes in which Alankaar Sharma discusses his work comparing and contrasting the well-known Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments and the lesser known Negro Project, both intended to further knowledge related to prevention and reducing the extent of sexually transmitted disease in African-American men. Here, Mr. Sharma concludes his discussion by attempting to answer the question, "Why the immense difference in support and time between the two studies?" He concludes with comments about African-American access to health care services today, and "post-racial" America.

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Episode 58 - Alankaar Sharma: Tuskegee and the Negro Project: The Intersections of Race, Gender, and Public Health (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 01, 2010, 11:22:31 AM

Image of Alankaar Sharma

From Tuskegee to current revelations of U.S. experiments in Guatemala in the 1940's, public health research and interventions have been impacted by intersections with race and gender. This is the first of two episodes in which Alankaar Sharma discusses his work comparing and contrasting the well-known Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments and the lesser known Negro Project, both intended to further knowledge related to prevention and reducing the extent of sexually transmitted disease in African-American men. Here, he describes the historical context of the studies and how stereotypical and dominant narratives of Black men influenced the research.

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Episode 41 - Dr. Elisabeth Reichert: Social Work and Human Rights

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD, MSSA

Monday, March 08, 2010, 10:46:40 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Elisabeth Reichert traces the history of the human rights movement and addresses the role of social work in that movement. She discusses the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, political, civil, social, and economic rights, and women's rights, and compares the concepts of universal verses culturally relative human rights. She concludes with a discussion of the role of international education and improved understanding of human rights.

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Episode 18 - Dr. Bruce Thyer: Looking at Evidence-Based Practice: How Did We Get Here?

Monday, April 20, 2009, 2:10:26 PM

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This podcast is a recording of a lecture by Professor Bruce Thyer on the roots of the evidence-based practice process. He grounds it in the best tradition of clinical social work, from the early development of scientific social work to empirically supported treatments.

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Episode 11 - Dr. Shelly Wiechelt: Cultural and Historical Trauma: Affecting Lives for Generations

Interviewer: Susan Green, LCSW

Monday, January 12, 2009, 12:03:52 PM

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People experience trauma in varying ways, from both trauma that occurs within their own lives, to trauma that is transmitted to them from cultural, historical, and intergenerational experiences. In this podcast, Dr. Shelly Wiechelt defines cultural, intergenerational, and historical trauma and discusses its impact on the lives of individuals and their communities.

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Episode 10 - Dr. Sandra Bloom: The Sanctuary Model: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Treatment and Services

Interviewer: Susan Green, LCSW

Monday, December 29, 2008, 11:27:32 AM

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Sandra L. Bloom, M.D., co-creator of the Sanctuary Model, discusses a trauma-informed approach to treatment and systems change. Dr. Bloom describes the paradigm shift needed to understand the psychobiology of trauma and its impact on recovery from mental illness.

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Episode 4 - Dr. Alex Gitterman: The Life Model: A 30-year Reflection

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD, MSW

Monday, October 06, 2008, 1:32:16 PM

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Dean Nancy Smyth speaks with Dr. Alex Gitterman, the Council on Social Work Education's 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, about the Life Model of Social Work Practice and its continued influence on the field.

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Episode 2 - Dr. Deborah Waldrop: End-of-Life Care for Our Nation's Elderly - History of Hospice Care (part 1 of 3)

Monday, September 08, 2008, 11:08:35 AM

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This is this first of three episodes in which Dr. Waldrop discusses her research on end-of-life care decision-making begun in 2007. In this episode, Dr. Waldrop explains the personal nature of studying end-of-life care and answers the questions, "What is hospice care?" and "What is its history?"

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DISCLAIMER: The content shared by the presenter(s) and/or interviewer(s) of each podcast is their own and not necessarily representative of any views, research, or practice from the UB School of Social Work or the inSocialWork® podcast series.

Get all episodes at the series' home page.

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