Poverty, Inequalities, & Disparities Episodes

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The following episodes are in the *Poverty, Inequalities, & Disparities* category:

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Episode 227 - Dr. Kristie Seelman: Sexual Minority Older Adults: Addressing Health Disparities and Promoting Healthy Aging

Interviewer: Louanne Bakk, PhD

Monday, November 06, 2017, 7:53:57 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Kristie Seelman discusses the unique challenges that lesbian, gay, and bisexual older adults face, as well as the need for services that are culturally competent and account for their unique realities. She describes her current research emphasizing coping strategies and differences in mental, cognitive, and physical health among sexual minority older persons.

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Episode 215 - Dr. Henry Louis Taylor Jr.: The Economics of Urban Segregation (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Caitlin Beck

Monday, May 08, 2017, 7:57:42 AM

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In this episode, the second of a two-part discussion on the economics of urban segregation, Dr. Henry Louis Taylor introduces the concept of the "just city." He illustrates the contrasts between the just city and the underdeveloped urban communities that permeate the United States today. He also outlines the important role that social work must play in the development of just communities. Finally, using his research and experience in Cuba as a framework, Dr. Taylor describes how a society with very limited resources has been able to create highly developed communities to meet the needs of its inhabitants and, in doing so, place people over profits.

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Episode 213 - Dr. Henry Louis Taylor Jr.: The Economics of Urban Segregation (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Caitlin Beck

Monday, April 10, 2017, 7:40:37 AM

Image of Dr. Henry Louis Taylor

With over 80 percent of Americans living in urban areas, it is crucial for social workers to consider how the development of cities in the United States has played a role in creating and maintaining the social and economic segregation that is so deeply woven into the fabric of most cities today. In the first of two episodes, Dr. Henry Louis Taylor argues that there is an intentionality to how cities are built that produces the "underdeveloped" neighborhoods that we see, where marginalized populations find themselves forced to live. Further, institutions put into place to solve the problems facing these communities are failing in their mission and have shifted to simply easing the suffering and misery of the communities' inhabitants.

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Episode 211 - Sarah Beck Buchanan, Wright Kaminer, and Dr. Roger Nooe: The Community Law Office: An Integration of Social Work and Criminal Defense

Interviewer: Laura Lewis, PhD

Monday, March 13, 2017, 7:32:43 AM

Image of Sarah Beck Buchanan, Wright Kaminer, and Dr. Roger Nooe

In the United States, there are more than ten million criminal arrests each year. It is well known that many of those arrested also have a number of personal and environmental issues that not only shape their daily lives but can also be influential in their arrests and affect their defense and sentencing. In this episode, Sarah Beck Buchanan, Wright Kaminer, and Dr. Roger Nooe of the Knox County Public Defender's Office discuss their program, which has social workers working in collaboration with public defense attorneys with the goal of producing better legal outcomes by addressing the psychosocial needs of their clients.

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Episode 202 - Dr. Wonhyung Lee, Meera Bhat, and Nurul Widyaningrum: Microfinance in India, Indonesia, and the United States: Implications for Social Work

Interviewer: Shaanta Murshid, PhD

Monday, October 24, 2016, 7:37:00 AM

Image of Dr. Wonhyung Lee, Meera Bhat, and Nurul Widyaningrum

Scholarly literature and practice experience have shown that low-income people around the world can use credit responsibly, make timely payments, and save to make their lives more manageable. In this episode, Dr. Wonhyung Lee, Meera Bhat, and Nurul Widyaningrum discuss the range of financial services called microfinance, which provides low-income persons access to affordable and quality financial services to promote empowerment and the building of assets.

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Episode 200 - Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault: Enhancing Relationships Forums: People and Law Enforcement Agencies Moving Change Forward

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, September 26, 2016, 7:40:54 AM

Image of Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault

In this episode, Dr. Sandra McGee, Teresa Hobson, Karen Gale, and Sandra Breault discuss their response to the widening divide between the African-American community and law enforcement officials. Following the killings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice, as well as NYPD officers Rafeal Ramos and Wenjian Liu, our guests developed a working group and an action plan. Enhancing Relationships Forums is the tangible result, and it brings together representatives of law enforcement personnel, the Social Work profession, members of the African-American community, and the community at large for empathic dialog. Here, they describe the process, lessons learned, and recommendations for community action in communities everywhere.

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Episode 197 - Dr. Larry Davis: "Why Are They Angry with Us?": A Discussion on Race and Racism in America

Interviewer: Nancy Smyth, PhD

Monday, August 15, 2016, 7:41:35 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Larry Davis engages in a wide-ranging discussion on race and racism in America. The topics he addresses include his use of cognitive dissonance theory to understand racism and racist behavior. He explores how implicit racism affects all members of American society and defines a concept he refers to as "relative deprivation." Dr. Davis also explains why multiculturalism is insufficient as the principal method of addressing racism.

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Episode 192 - Dr. Caroline Long Burry: "No One Asked About My Children": Voices of Incarcerated Mothers

Interviewer: Patricia Logan-Greene, PhD

Monday, May 23, 2016, 9:42:09 AM

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A report from the Bureau of Justice Statistics showed that from 1991 to 2007 the number of incarcerated mothers increased by a startling one hundred and thirty-one percent. In this podcast, Dr. Caroline Long Burry discusses a pilot study she conducted with these parents with the hope of better understanding their parenting experiences. Also explored are the mothers' attempts to negotiate the criminal justice system while in their role as parents.

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Episode 186 - Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone: The Anti-Racism Project: A Strategy for Preparing Social Work Educators

Interviewer: Berg Miller, MSW

Monday, February 29, 2016, 8:52:37 AM

Image of Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone

The NASW Code of Ethics and International Federation of Social Workers’ "Statement of Ethical Principles" call for social workers to challenge discrimination, oppression, and "unjust policies and practices." In the United States, racism remains a lasting and pernicious example of those injustices. In this podcast, Dr. Ashley Davis and Dr. Allyson Livingstone describe the development of their Anti-Racism Project. The discussion includes their experience as the Project's facilitators and group members, research connected to the Project, and their advocacy for the need to include equity work in social work doctoral education. They also identify four important themes that seemed to emanate from their work.

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Episode 178 - Dr. Devonya Havis: "Stand Your Ground" Legislation and Implications for State-Sponsored Racism

Interviewer: Steven Halady, PhD

Monday, October 26, 2015, 7:50:57 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Devonya Havis describes how "Stand Your Ground" legislation, intended to safeguard our society's most vulnerable members, has been utilized in ways that perpetuate and even exacerbate existing disparities experienced by persons of color. She discusses implicit bias, the bidirectional relationship between blackness and crime, "reasonable belief", and how these forces combine to shape individual behavior as well as societal institutions and systems.

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Episode 165 - Dr. James Mulvale: Basic Income: An Anti-Poverty Strategy for Social Work

Interviewer: Gretchen Ely, PhD

Monday, April 13, 2015, 9:34:35 AM

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In this episode, Dr. James Mulvale explains the idea of a basic income. He offers reasons for instituting a basic income and reviews some of the typical objections. Dr. Mulvale also provides a rationale for why this is an anti-poverty model that social work should embrace.

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Episode 164 - Dr. Richard Smith: A Social Worker's Report from the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development

Interviewer: Shaanta Murshid, PhD

Monday, March 30, 2015, 9:08:45 AM

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In this episode, our guest Dr. Richard Smith describes his attendance and experiences at the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Highlighting Social Work's long history of working to improve environmental conditions, end poverty, and foster social development, Dr. Smith discusses the conference's takeaways and the implications for social work practice.

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Episode 153 - Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Laurie Cook Heffron: Modern Slavery: Social Work's Role in Addressing Human Trafficking

Interviewer: Hilary Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, October 13, 2014, 8:04:28 AM

Image of Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Laurie Cook Heffron

The United Nations Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking estimates that there as many as 2.5 million people in forced labor at any given time. The U.S. State Department estimates that between 600,000 and 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year. There may be as many as 27 million slaves in the world today. In this episode, Dr. Noël Busch-Armendariz and Ms. Laurie Cook Heffron examine these disturbing issues and describe social work's role in addressing them.

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Episode 152 - Dr. Mimi Abramovitz: Changes in U.S. Social Welfare Policy: The Effects of Privatization on Human Services (part 2 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, September 29, 2014, 8:47:48 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Mimi Abramovitz continues her discussion of the rise of New Public Management (NPM) and the privatization of human services. She concludes by discussing her research on the impact of NPM on persons in the front lines of human service agencies and the services they provide.

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Episode 150 - Dr. Mimi Abramovitz: Changes in U.S. Social Welfare Policy: The Effects of Privatization on Human Services (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Wooksoo Kim, PhD

Monday, September 01, 2014, 5:45:56 PM

Image of Dr. Mimi Abramovitz

In this episode, Dr. Mimi Abramovitz discusses the privatization of human services and the rise of New Public Management. She reviews evolving economic conditions, historical changes in U.S. social welfare policy, and the subsequent impact on human service agencies, their workforce and, ultimately, the clients they serve.

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Episode 147 - Dr. Rukshan Fernando and Andy Germak: Social Entrepreneurship as a Social Work Practice

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, July 07, 2014, 9:57:36 AM

Image of Dr. Rukshan Fernando and Andy Germak

When asked about the word "entrepreneurship," most people are likely to think about business-oriented activities, perhaps, more specifically, using business innovation as a route to develop or enhance a business enterprise. However, most people probably have not considered using social consciousness as a foundation for engaging in entrepreneurial activities. In this podcast, Professors Rukshan Fernando and Andy Germak will explore using entrepreneurship as a method to address social change.

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Episode 142 - Chandran Chetan: Action and Empowerment in India: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, April 28, 2014, 8:41:06 AM

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In this episode, Chandran Chetan continues our previous discussion of India's "invisible maids" and the human trafficking that is fostered by the demand for these workers. Here, our guest describes how the National Domestic Workers Movement builds institutional support for the workers and how they promote social action and change through the direct participation of the women in speaking out on their own behalf. Fr. Chetan highlights the movement's work in organization and unionization activities and outlines the current activity and challenges on behalf of this exploited population.

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Episode 140 - Christin Mary: India's Invisible Maids: National Domestic Workers Movement

Interviewer: Filomena Critelli, PhD

Monday, March 31, 2014, 8:08:27 AM

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In this episode, Christin Mary of the National Domestic Workers Movement describes her work advocating, organizing, and participating in social action to empower exploited domestic workers in India. Young women, typically from impoverished rural areas, are trafficked into cities, where their human rights are violated. Our guest describes her organization's efforts in organizing and empowering these women, as well as the legislative successes they have realized.

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Episode 136 - Dr. Brian Kelly: Superman in the Smallest Place: Exploring a Music Studio for Young People Experiencing Homelessness

Interviewer: Steven Schwartz

Monday, February 03, 2014, 8:27:48 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Brian Kelly describes his experience and research with homeless youth. Specifically, he looks into the effectiveness of utilizing a music studio in a transitional living program to engage young people's strengths and promote their resilience.

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Episode 131 - Dr. Toni Miles: Health Care Policy: Medicaid Expansion and the Affordable Care Act

Interviewer: Nancy Kusmaul, LMSW, PhD

Monday, November 11, 2013, 8:20:55 AM

Image of Dr. Toni P. Miles

Created in 1965, Medicaid, a form of health insurance, was developed to address the health care needs of low-income families as well as individuals who had a disability, were blind, or were aged. Recently, Medicaid is undergoing change. With the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid offers the opportunity for expanding eligibility. In this episode, Dr. Toni P. Miles discusses health care policy, Medicaid expansion, and the Affordable Care Act.

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Episode 126 - Dr. Jodi Jacobson Frey and Robin McKinney: Financial Social Work: Advancing the Economic Stability and Capability of Individuals, Families, and Communities

Interviewer: Peter Sobota, LCSW

Monday, September 02, 2013, 10:02:28 AM

Image of Dr. Jodi Jacobson Frey and Robin McKinney

In this episode, our guests Dr. Jodi Jacobson Frey and Robin McKinney discuss their work with the Financial Social Work Initiative at the University of Maryland School of Social Work and the Maryland CASH Campaign. They discuss how social workers can work to improve and sustain clients’ financial capability, while collaborating with community members and professionals from a variety of disciplines, to improve economic conditions for individuals and communities through direct practice, advocacy, policy development, and research.

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Episode 125 - Dr. Michael Reisch: The State of Social Work Education (part 1 of 2)

Interviewer: Hilary N. Weaver, MS, DSW

Monday, August 19, 2013, 9:03:02 AM

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In this episode, the first of two parts, Dr. Michael Reisch describes the role that social work education has in facilitating the emerging professional’s understanding of the institutional and structural inequalities facing oppressed and disenfranchised people. He also discusses the necessity for social work to reconnect with its historical mission of directly addressing social injustice.

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Episode 121 - Dr. Christina Sogar: Beyond Diagnosis: The Dynamics of Disability and Disruptions in Parenting

Interviewer: Kathleen A. Knaak, LMSW

Monday, June 10, 2013, 9:18:57 AM

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It has been suggested that there are between 4.1 and 9 million parents who have a disability. In this episode, Dr. Christina Sogar discusses how characteristics of disability (e.g., onset and symptom variability) impact and shape the parenting process and can increase the likelihood of child welfare involvement.

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Episode 112 - Dr. Sandra Butler: Should I Stay or Should I Go?: Home Care Workers and Factors Affecting Turnover and Retention

Interviewer: Diane Elze, Ph.D.

Monday, February 04, 2013, 9:09:15 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Sandra Butler discusses her work and findings with the Maine Home Healthcare Retention Study. Putting a human face on "the centerpiece of our long-term care system," Dr. Butler describes the predictors of turnover and retention and how the workers themselves describe their jobs. She tells us what she has learned about why these workers stay and why significant numbers of them leave their positions.

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Episode 109 - Dr. Luke Shaefer: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (Food Stamps) and the Material Well-Being of Low-Income Families with Children

Interviewer: Charles Syms, LCSW

Monday, December 10, 2012, 9:02:00 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Luke Shaefer discusses the effects of the U.S.'s largest means-tested income support program, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program. Recent breakthroughs in research methods have allowed us to better measure these effects, and results suggest that SNAP improves food security among participant households as well as non-food material well-being.

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Episode 106 - Dr. Yunju Nam: Asset-Based Policy: A New Direction in Social Welfare Policy

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD

Monday, October 29, 2012, 9:30:50 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Yunju Nam describes her research in Asset-Based Policy, an alternative to our current income maintenance policies that attempt to respond to the needs of social welfare recipients. She describes how this new paradigm addresses the long term needs of persons living in or near poverty. In addition, Dr. Nam discusses the psychological benefit that asset ownership has on a person's hope, motivation, and quality of life.

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Episode 89 - Dr. Eugene Walls: School Engagement Among Sexual Minority Students: Allies, Alliances, and Academic Outcomes

Interviewer: Diane Elze, PhD, MSSA

Monday, February 06, 2012, 8:29:45 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. Eugene Walls discusses his research on school engagement among sexual minority students. His research is aimed at understanding the contributing roles of school climate, adult allies, and gay-straight alliances in predicting academic outcomes.

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Episode 81 - Jessica Greenawalt: Using Social Capital to Achieve Goals in a Low-Income, Immigrant Community

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, October 03, 2011, 8:41:53 AM

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Jessica Greenawalt discusses her work with the Chelsea Collaborative Social Capital Campaign to improve community-level outcomes. The Collaborative used participatory action research methods to assess the community's needs and develop initiatives to meet those needs through civic engagement.

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Episode 73 - Dr. Rebecca Thomas and Dr. Jill Witmer Sinha: Microcredit, Women Entrepreneurs, and Nonprofits in Kolkata: Social Work's Local and International Role

Interviewer: Kathleen Kost, PhD, MSSW, MA

Monday, June 13, 2011, 8:32:24 AM

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Microfinance is recognized as an anti-poverty tool and a conduit for financial assistance and capacity building. In their research, Drs. Rebecca Thomas and Jill Witmer Sinha examine differences between the benefits provided by nonprofit and for-profit microfinance institutions specifically as they pertain to women. Drs. Thomas and Sinha present findings from a case study of one program in Kolkata, India highlighting the array of complementary services offered to microloan clients and their potential for bridging the gap between the "haves and have-nots."

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Episode 72 - Dr. Jan Ivery and Dr. M. Lori Thomas: Aging in Place on the Streets: Homelessness Among Older Adults

Interviewer: Nancy Kusmaul, LMSW

Tuesday, May 31, 2011, 8:14:14 AM

Image of Drs. Jan Ivery and M. Lori Thomas

Drs. Jan Ivery and M. Lori Thomas discuss the findings of their research with the often overlooked older adult homeless population. Our guests describe the challenges of meeting the unique needs of this population and the contradictions that are raised as the older adult homeless population burgeons.

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Episode 70 - Dr. David Patterson, Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya): Promoting Wellness and Challenging Cultural Narratives in Native American Communities

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, May 02, 2011, 8:19:00 AM

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In this episode, Dr. David Patterson describes the Three Sisters and other core ideas that informed the creation and evolution of the Native American Center for Wellness Research. This discussion explores how the Center builds programs that enhance the educational experiences of Native American students, researches and promotes Native American wellness, and collaborates in peace and social justice ceremonies in the community.

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Episode 64 - Dr. Anna Santiago, Dr. George Galster, and Renee Nicolosi: Where People Live Matters: Using Housing Policy as an Anti-Poverty and Asset-Building Intervention

Interviewer: Kelly Patterson, PhD, MS

Monday, February 07, 2011, 9:56:54 AM

Image of Dr. Anna Santiago, Dr. George Galster, and Renee Nicolosi

In this episode, our guests discuss their research that attempts to respond to and understand how housing policy influences not only its clients, but the neighborhoods in which they reside. They describe, amongst other programs, the Home Ownership Program in Denver, Colorado; their longitudinal research; their findings; and the continuing challenges to sustaining home ownership and its effect on poverty.

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Episode 57 - Dr. Robert Milch and Dr. Donald Shedd: Good Outcomes at the End of Life: The History of Hospice Buffalo

Interviewer: Deborah Waldrop, PhD, LMSW

Monday, October 18, 2010, 10:56:06 AM

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Drs. Robert Milch and Donald Shedd have been leaders in the hospice movement since its early days. In this episode, they discuss the history of hospice and hospice in Buffalo, NY, the challenges of the early days of hospice, changes in hospice care over the years, and what they see as the future of hospice and palliative care.

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Episode 54 - Joyce James, LMSW-AP and Carolyne Rodriguez, MSW: Addressing Disproportionality: Promising Practice Innovations

Interviewer: Adjoa Robinson, PhD, MSW

Monday, September 06, 2010, 10:39:06 AM

Image of Joyce James, LMSW-AP and Carolyne Rodriguez, MSW

In this episode, Joyce James of the Texas Department of Family Protective Services and Carolyne Rodriguez of Casey Family Programs' Texas State Strategy systems improvement initiative discuss how their collaboration is addressing disproportionality statewide through promising practices and innovations in undoing racism trainings, values-based leadership development, and community engagement strategies.

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Episode 36 - Dr. Claude Welch: Spotlight on Human Rights: Economic Rights in the United States

Interviewer: Peter Sobota, LCSW

Monday, December 28, 2009, 8:38:41 AM

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In this episode, Dr. Claude Welch, Jr. explains his contention that human rights can be violated as a result of economic structures. Currently, the issues involved in our response to the economic crisis and U.S. health care reform speak to our society's commitment to protect the human rights of its citizens. Dr. Welch describes the economic conditions that underlie problems such as poverty, housing, and working conditions that create inequality in a wealthy, capitalist society such as the United States.

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Episode 17 - Dr. Sandra Lane: Structural Violence and Disparities in Health

Interviewer: Bernadette Hoppe, JD, MPH, MA

Monday, April 06, 2009, 10:45:20 AM

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In this podcast, Dr. Sandra Lane discusses how policy and environment promote disparities in health among people of color.

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Episode 6 - Dr. Karen Sowers: Social Work at its Roots: Using Microenterprise to Promote Health, Social Welfare, and Community Building Among Street Children in Indonesia

Interviewer: Catherine Dulmus, PhD, MSW

Monday, November 03, 2008, 10:44:03 AM

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Dr. Catherine Dulmus, Director of the Buffalo Center for Social Research, speaks with Dr. Karen Sowers, Dean of the College of Social Work at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, about a project aimed at developing microenterprise among street children in Indonesia.

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